Community:Email 03sep09

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent Sep 03, 2009. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN) data now online. From PT Jayachandran (jaya@unb.ca). See also http://chain.physics.unb.ca.

(2) Cornell University Offers Space Weather Distance Learning Program with Mike Kelley. From Katy Heine (kah223@cornell.edu). See also http://www.sce.cornell.edu/spaceweather

(3) Fall AGU Meeting, San Francisco, CA, 14-18 December 2009 - abstracts due 3 Sep at http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm09. (a) A07: Meteoroids and Their Atmospheric Effects, From Meers Oppenheim (meerso@bu.edu).

(b) SM17: The Scientific Promise of Nanosatellites and CubeSats to Advance Geospace and Upper Atmosphere Science, From: David Klumpar (klump@physics.montana.edu).


(1) Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN) data now online.


Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN) is a network of six Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosondes (CADIs) and ten high data rate GPS receivers in the Canadian Arctic. Most of the instruments are now deployed and in full operation. Data from these remote sites are transferred to the University of New Brunswick on a real time basis. Data and details of CHAIN can be found at: http://chain.physics.unb.ca. This site allows interactive plotting and analysis of the data as well as data downloads. The site also provides real-time scintillation activity in the polar cap. Infrastructure funding for CHAIN is provided by the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the New Brunswick Innovation Foundation. CHAIN operation is conducted in collaboration with the Canadian Space Agency.


(2) Cornell University Offers Space Weather Distance Learning Program with Mike Kelley.


From Katy Heine (kah223@cornell.edu).

Because severe space weather affects the world's communications, navigation, and power systems as well as human habitation and space exploration, its accurate prediction has far-reaching implications. One of the newest fields in geophysics, space weather will be the subject of a unique distance learning program to be offered by Cornell beginning this September and available through May 31, 2010. The course, Space Weather: A New Frontier, is available to individuals for credit or audit and to institutions by license.

World-renowned space weather expert Dr. Michael Kelley will introduce scientists, engineers, policy makers, and students to the basic atmospheric, ionospheric, and magnetospheric physics necessary to understand and predict space weather. He will be pioneering a new teaching style based on a series of forty one-hour video-streamed lectures. (This is described in more detail in the attachment.) Registrants will be able to set their own viewing schedules, 'attend' lectures at their own pace, and review any lecture as often as they wish. The course text is the newly published second edition of Dr. Kelley's The Earth's Ionosphere: Plasma Physics and Electrodynamics.

Dr. Kelley is the James A. Friend Family Distinguished Professor of Engineering in Cornell�s top-ranked School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a winner of numerous teaching awards. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Solar and Space Plasmas, and former chair of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics. Among his many distinctions, he is responsible for placing more complex in instruments in space than any other person.

For more information, please contact: Mary E. Adie, Director of Special Programs and Executive Education, School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions, Cornell University, B-20 Day Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-3901 USA, Tel. 1-607-255-7624, Fax 1-607-255-9697, E-mail: cusp@cornell.edu, http://www.sce.cornell.edu/spaceweather


(3) Fall AGU Meeting, San Francisco, CA, 14-18 December 2009 - abstracts due 3 Sep at http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm09. (a) A07: Meteoroids and Their Atmospheric Effects,


From Meers Oppenheim (meerso@bu.edu).

There will be a special session on A07: Meteoroids and Their Atmospheric Effects." We invite all researchers interested in this topic to submit their abstracts. The meeting will be held between December 14 and 18 in San Francisco, CA. The deadline for abstract submission is Sept. 3 (without exception). The exact time and date for this session is not yet set. For more meeting information see: http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm09/index.php.

Details: A07: Meteoroids and Their Atmospheric Effects, Sponsor: SPA - Aeronomy CoSponsor: Planetary Sciences

Description: Millions of small meteoroids enter the Earth's upper atmosphere every second, adding metals to the atmosphere and occasionally damaging spacecraft. Detections of these particles give us information about the solar system, the region of the atmosphere in which they ablate, and enable us to monitor upper atmospheric winds. In the last few years, high-resolution measurements by large radars have furthered our understanding of these topics. This session invites all researchers with new meteor related results to submit an abstract.

Conveners: Meers Oppenheim, meerso@bu.edu

Lars Dyrud, ldyrud@yahoo.com

Sigrid Close, sigrid@lanl.gov

Yours, Meers Oppenheim


(3) Fall AGU Meeting, San Francisco, CA, 14-18 December 2009 - abstracts due 3 Sep at http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm09. (b) SM17: The Scientific Promise of Nanosatellites and CubeSats to Advance Geospace and Upper Atmosphere Science


From: David Klumpar (klump@physics.montana.edu).

Session SM-17 The Scientific Promise of Nanosatellites and CubeSats to Advance Geospace and Upper Atmosphere Science (Co-sponsored by Atmospheric and Space Electricity and SPA - Aeronomy).

Description: Scientific investigations utilizing extremely small satellite platforms are being proposed and undertaken to study the Upper Atmosphere, Thermosphere, Ionosphere, and Magnetosphere. Will significant contributions to science be achieved, or are these merely 'toys' with little scientific value?

Relatively inexpensive satellites may enable innovative mission approaches: including multisatellite constellations permitting simultaneous, coordinated observations from multiple vantage points; or, owing to low fabrication and launch costs, limited lifetime missions (�throw-away satellites�) reaching into the mesosphere or even the ignorosphere.

The NSF's CubeSat-based Science Missions for Space Weather and Atmospheric Research Program has received proposals and selected missions in both 2008 and 2009. NASA is apparently considering nanosatellites, and even CubeSats, as potential research tools.

We solicit presentations that focus on the scientific promise of nanosatellites to advance understanding of Geospace Sciences. Papers describing results of flown missions are particularly solicited, as are mission concepts that demonstrate potential for significant future scientific advances.

Details at: http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm09/program/scientific_session_search.php?show=detail&sessid=665

From your Convenors: David Klumpar (klump@physics.montana.edu), Gary Swenson, Charles Swenson, Kristina Lynch.