Community:Email 05feb13

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent 05 Feb 2013. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) Abstracts due TOMORROW (6 Feb 2013) at http://moa.agu.org/2013/ for 14-17 May 2013 AGU Meeting of the Americas in Cancun, Mexico.

  • (a) SA02 Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics and Disturbances

from chaosong.huang at kirtland.af.mil

  • (b) SA03 Studies of the low-latitude thermosphere / ionosphere in the American sector

from marco.milla at jro.igp.gob.pe

  • (c) SA04 Understanding the Mid- and Low-Latitude Ionosphere [and Thermosphere]

from ethan.miller at jhuapl.edu

(2) 28-29 March 2013 Third Annual Space Weather Community Operations Workshop (SpWxCOW3) at Park City, Utah. From Kent Tobiska <ktobiska at spacenvironment.net>. See also https://spaceweather.usu.edu/htm/space-weather-cow/

(3) 20-25 October 2013 "Planet Mars" workshop in les Houches, France - registration deadline 31 May. From Olivier Witasse <owitasse at rssd.esa.int>. See also http://www.sciops.esa.int/mars4

(4) Special SCOSTEP Bulletin declares 2013 MiniMax24 on 30 January 2013. From Nat Gopalswamy (gopals at ssedmail.gsfc.nasa.gov). See also https://igam02ws.uni-graz.at/mediawiki/index.php?title=Main_Page


(1a) SA02 Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics and Disturbances


from chaosong.huang at kirtland.af.mil

Dear colleagues,

We cordially invite you to submit an abstract to the following special session at the American Geophysical Union - Meeting of the Americas, Cancun, Mexico, 14-17 May 2013. Abstract submission deadline is Wednesday, 6 February, 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time.

Meeting website: http://moa.agu.org/2013/

Session title: SA02 Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics and Disturbances

Session description: The equatorial ionosphere behaves very differently under different solar and geomagnetic conditions. This session focuses on how the equatorial ionospheric plasma drift responds to magnetic storms, what determines the generation of equatorial spread F and plasma bubbles, how significantly seeding perturbations affect the generation of plasma bubbles, how the occurrence of equatorial spread F depends on longitude and solar activity, and how ionospheric scintillation is correlated with spread F irregularities. We welcome observational and simulation studies that address these topics and that aim to improve the current capability of forecasting low-latitude ionospheric disturbances, spread F irregularities, and scintillation activities.

Thank you.

Conveners

Chaosong Huang, AFRL, US

Endawoke Yizengaw, Boston College, US


(1b) SA03 Studies of the low-latitude thermosphere / ionosphere in the American sector


from marco.milla at jro.igp.gob.pe

Dear Colleague

We would like to cordially invite you to submit a contribution for a scientific session focused on “Studies of the low-latitude thermosphere / ionosphere in the American sector”, which is part of the 2013 AGU Meeting of the Americas (http://moa.agu.org/2013/).

The session welcomes papers presenting results of theoretical and experimental studies of the low-latitude thermosphere and ionosphere (TI) system. We particularly encourage contributions related to studies focused in the American sector. We also encourage presentations describing results of recently deployed instruments, plans for the installation of new instrumentation/observatories, and presentations describing new/upcoming observational campaigns. Finally, we invite contributions that address the dynamics of the low-latitude thermosphere/ionosphere in the American sector compared to other longitude sectors.

This year, the meeting of the Americas will be held in Cancun, Mexico between May 14 and 17, 2013.

Deadline for submission of abstracts is February 6th, 2013.

We look forward to seeing you in Mexico!

Fabiano Rodrigues, Koki Chau, Marco Milla, Eurico de Paula


(1c) SA04 Understanding the Mid- and Low-Latitude Ionosphere [and Thermosphere]


From ethan.miller at jhuapl.edu.

Dear Colleagues,

The deadline for abstract submission for the AGU Meeting of the Americas in Cancun, 14-17 May 2013, is approaching quickly (6 February, 2359 ET).

We invite your participation in SA04 Understanding the Mid- and Low-Latitude Ionosphere [and Thermosphere]:

http://moa.agu.org/2013/scientific-program/sessions/sa04/

Over the past decade, new approaches have been developed to understand ionospheric plasma processes, coupling between ions and neutrals, and the coupling between the lower atmosphere and the ionosphere. Large- to small-scale numerical and analytical models, assimilative techniques at a variety of spatial and temporal scales, new platforms and opportunities for in situ and remote sensing instruments, and the availability of another solar cycle of data, have made these new approaches practical and accessible to the broader community. This session solicits contributions addressing these emerging and developing areas. Submissions that address the longitudinal and hemispheric differences and/or variability are especially encouraged.

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you in Cancun!

Ethan Miller and Larry Paxton


(2) 28-29 March 2013 Third Annual Space Weather Community Operations Workshop (SpWxCOW3) at Park City, Utah.


From Kent Tobiska <ktobiska at spacenvironment.net>.

The Third Annual Space Weather Community Operations Workshop (SpWxCOW3) will be held March 28 and 29 at the Newpark Resort in Park City, Utah. Participants will share common operational problems and solutions, as well as work toward developing common best practices, and eventually standards, for Space Weather operations. Topic areas will cover operational activities from production, archiving, and distribution best practices to utilization expectations. Sponsors for the meeting are the American Commercial Space Weather Association (ACSWA), the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), the National Weather Service Space Weather Prediction Center (NWS SWPC), the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the Utah State University Space Weather Center (USU SWC). For more information, and to register to attend, please visit our website and sign-up page: https://spaceweather.usu.edu/htm/space-weather-cow/.


(3) 20-25 October 2013 "Planet Mars" workshop in les Houches, France - registration deadline 31 May.


From Olivier Witasse <owitasse at rssd.esa.int>.

Dear colleagues

On behalf of the organising committee, it is my pleasure to send out this 1st announcement and welcome you all in joining us at the 4th workshop "Planet Mars", to be held in les Houches (France), on 20-25 October 2013. The goals of the workshop are to integrate the main results of both the recent Earth-based observations and the missions to Mars into a new global picture of Mars evolution. With the same spirit of the previous workshops, discussions among scientists of different disciplines will be encouraged and it is foreseen that they will help refine the scientific goals of the future missions to Mars.

This workshop is an opportunity for the young scientists to be updated on the most recent results and to be trained in some specific data processing techniques. In addition to the previous editions, a specific session will be devoted to comparative analyses of Mars, Venus, the Earth and Titan in all their aspects (internal structure; atmospheric composition and photochemistry; climatology; this session will take advantage of recent results acquired, in particular, by the Venus Express and Cassini missions, as well as recent developments on global climate models of Venus and Titan.

More at: http://www.sciops.esa.int/mars4

Deadline for registration: 31 May 2013

Best Regards, with apologies for multiple postings.

Olivier Witasse, European Space Agency, ESTEC, Noordwijk, The Netherlands

owitasse@rssd.esa.int


(4) Special SCOSTEP Bulletin declares 2013 MiniMax24 on 30 January 2013.


From Nat Gopalswamy (gopals at ssedmail.gsfc.nasa.gov).

SCOSTEP Declares the year 2013 as the year of the MiniMax24 By Dr. Nat Gopalswamy (NASA GSFC), SCOSTEP President

The Scientific Committee on Solar Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP) is declaring the year 2013 as the year of MiniMax24 to mark the unusually small maximum of solar cycle 24, following an unusually long solar minimum that has been witnessed recently.

SCOSTEP seeks focus on the current peculiar state of the Sun by declaring the year 2013 as the year of “MiniMax24” to note that the Sun is going through activity maximum conditions, but the activity is rather low. SCOSTEP will conduct year-long scientific and outreach activities to understand and explain the current behavior of the Sun and its potential impact on human society and Earth’s space environment. The scientific activity will include a comprehensive observing campaign named “MiniMax24 Campaign” to record the subdued activity of the Sun and compare it with that of previous cycles. In particular, events on the Sun will be recorded and tracked all the way to Earth’s atmosphere along paths of mass and electromagnetic flow from the Sun. Outreach activities explaining the implications of the weak solar activity on space weather and Earth’s climate. SCOSTEP encourages year-long activities to be led by national SCOSTEP committees and by task group leaders of the current SCOSTEP scientific program CAWSES (Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System).

Solar cycle 24 is the 24th cycle since 1755, each cycle lasting for about 11 years. Cycle 24 began around January 8, 2008 but the activity was minimal through early 2009. The current solar cycle is the subject of active research, as it does not appear to be generating sunspots in the manner which would be expected. Sunspots did not begin to appear immediately after the last minimum (in 2008) and although they started to reappear in late 2009, they are at a significantly lower level than anticipated. The International Space Environment Service predicts the cycle to peak at 90 sunspots in May 2013, compared to the 120 observed at the peak of the solar cycle 23 (May 1996 – Dec 2008).

Most recent observations have shown that the weaker polar field strength observed during the solar cycle 23-24 minimum has resulted in a weaker solar cycle 24. In the northern hemisphere of the Sun, solar maximum conditions prevailed throughout the year 2012 and the sunspot number reached a maximum value of only about 90, while the southern hemisphere has just started entering into the maximum phase. The peculiar behavior of the Sun may be an indicator that it is progressing towards a grand solar minimum, which will have serious consequences in solar-terrestrial space. The unusual conditions during the solar cycle 23-24 minimum were observed on the Sun, in the heliosphere, and in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere of Earth.

When the Maunder minimum (also known as the prolonged sunspot minimum, 1645 - 1715) happened in the seventeenth century, humans were not aware of the long-term modulation of solar activity. But a potential grand minimum is now underway, which can be recorded with ground and space based instruments for comparison with previous solar cycles. In particular, it will be important to investigate how the weaker solar influence will affect the neutral atmosphere we live in and the extended geospace environment.

Dr. Manuela Temmer, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Austria will be the MiniMax24 Campaign Coordinator and she has kindly agreed to do so. All the campaign activities will be recorder at: https://igam02ws.uni-graz.at/mediawiki/index.php?title=Main_Page.