Community:Email 09jun11

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent 09 June 2011. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) 05-09 Dec 2011, San Francisco, CA, Fall AGU Session SA04: Coupled Geospace Studies. From Alan Burns (aburns at ucar.edu). See also http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/scientific-program/session-search/

(2) Movable Antarctic Incoherent Scatter Radar (MAISR) Workshop at URSI, Istanbul 13.-14. August 2011. From: Anja Strømme <Anja.Stromme at sri.com>. See also http://www.ursigass2011.org/ and ftp://isr.sri.com/pub/Antarctic-ISR/Antarctic_ISR_Workshop_2008.pdf

(3) CEDAR-GEM 26 June-01 July 2011, Santa Fe, NM: "Nightside Multi-scale Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere (MIT) Electrodynamic Coupling during Geomagnetic Disturbances". From: Shasha Zou <sha at atmos.ucla.edu>. See also http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2011_Workshop:Multi_scale_MIT_coupling


(1) 05-09 Dec 2011, San Francisco, CA, Fall AGU Session SA04: Coupled Geospace Studies.


From Alan Burns (aburns at ucar.edu).

Description: Significant improvements have been made in the last 10 years in developing coupled models of Geospace. The increased sophistication of these models has led to opportunities to better understand interactions between the various Geospace regions. This session solicits presentations that address this coupling, including, but not limited to, magnetosphere-plasmasphere-ionosphere-thermosphere interactions, and radiation belts and ion outflow in a coupled Geospace system. Contributions pertaining to model validation and experimental studies that shed light on this system coupling are also sought.

Convenors: Alan Burns, Joe Huba, Geoff Crowley and Mike Wiltberger.

contact: aburns@ucar.edu

At present session information can be found by typing SA04 in http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/scientific-program/session-search/


(2) Movable Antarctic Incoherent Scatter Radar (MAISR) Workshop at URSI, Istanbul 13.-14. August 2011.


From: Anja Strømme <Anja.Stromme at sri.com>.

We are hereby drawing your attention to the second “International Antarctic Incoherent Scatter Radar Workshop” to be held in conjunction with the XXX URSI general assembly (http://www.ursigass2011.org/) in Istanbul, Turkey, 13. – 14. August 2011.

In August 2008 the first International Antarctic Incoherent Scatter Radar Workshop was hosted in conjunction with the XXIX URSI general assembly in Chicago, and the report “The Antarctic Incoherent Scatter Radar Facility – Transformational Solar-Terrestrial Research in the High South” (ftp://isr.sri.com/pub/Antarctic-ISR/Antarctic_ISR_Workshop_2008.pdf) was published shortly thereafter.

The U.S. geospace sciences community has proposed a Movable Antarctic Incoherent Scatter Radar (MAISR) to be considered by the National Science Foundation. The first MAISR is currently targeted for the U.S. Antarctic station McMurdo to address the polar cap ionospheric research, and the MAISR's feasibility study is underway. The overarching goal of the MAISR Workshop is to inspire international scientific communities to consider be partners in the MAISR construction and exploitation, especially looking for the future sites where MAISR could be moved after initial operation.

Topics of the workshop will be:

  • Construction of a road map of the relevant science topics
  • Creation of a timeline for location/re-location of the MAISR systems and a science plan compliant with:
    • The most urgent science topics to address
    • Natural variation like solar cycles
    • National and international science and infrastructure plans, both in Antarctica and the conjugate high north.

The meeting will last all day Saturday 13. August and end after lunch Sunday 14. August 2011, and will be a combination of invited and contributed talks. A more detailed agenda and information about the venue and deadlines will follow shortly.

For more information contact Anja Strømme (anja.stromme@sri.com).

Very best regards

The MAISR Team


(3) CEDAR-GEM 26 June-01 July 2011, Santa Fe, NM: "Nightside Multi-scale Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere (MIT) Electrodynamic Coupling during Geomagnetic Disturbances".


From: Shasha Zou <sha at atmos.ucla.edu>.

Conveners: Michael Nicolls, Shasha Zou, Larry Lyons

We invite contributions to this joint session that will be held on Wednesday, June 29th, 10-12 am and 1:30-3:30 pm (2 2-hour sessions). We would like to encourage a workshop-style presentation with 10-15 min including discussion time. Please contact Michael Nicolls (michael.nicolls@sri.com), Shasha Zou (shashaz@umich.edu) or Larry Lyons (larry @atmos.ucla.edu) to schedule your contribution.

Description of objectives of this session:

The MIT system behaves as a complex system characterized by coupling and feedbacks, preconditioning, and memory. This system is of great interest to both the GEM and CEDAR communities and includes a variety of important topics that are common to both initiatives. Understanding the MIT during periods of geomagnetic disturbances as an integrated system as well as from perspectives of each discipline is necessary to move the area forward.

Field-aligned currents (FACs) are the essential mediator between the magnetosphere and the ionosphere. FACs modify the ionospheric conductivities by increasing or depleting the ionospheric density through associated particle precipitation and evacuation processes, respectively. The modified conductivity in turn regulates the magnetospheric drivers by changing the exerting forces and electric field distributions, including generating important structured electric fields, such as Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams / Sub-Auroral Ion Drifts (SAPS/SAID). The structured ionospheric density also provides important information about the location/polarity of the FACs and the energy distribution of the precipitating particles in the case of upward FACs.

Geomagnetic disturbances targeted in this joint session include, but are not limited to, substorms, PBIs, streamers and SMCs. These geomagnetic disturbances are associated with enhanced FACs and highly structured auroral forms. The characteristics of FACs, including their 2-D horizontal distribution and their development and evolution through the course of these disturbances, have never been directly observed at sufficient temporal resolution to resolve the intricacies of their dynamics. The newly available Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) magnetometers will enable us to conduct for the first time 2-D imaging of the FACs distribution. Combined with the perpendicular currents calculated from existing models, they will be able to provide the global-scale 3-D current distribution in the ionosphere. In addition, the continental-scale THEMIS ground-based ASIs and the multi-spectral cameras will enable us to associate auroral forms with direct FAC measurements. Moreover, ground-based radars, including both coherent and incoherent scatter radars, can provide detailed information about the global convection flow and thus electric field patterns, as well as the altitude profile of electron density. Furthermore, with the increasing availability of ground-based GPS receivers, global-scale total electron content can be obtained and the effect of FACs in modifying the ionospheric electron density distribution can be readily evaluated. In the magnetosphere, the NASA THEMIS satellites enable investigation of the linkage between the physical processes in the magnetosphere and structures observed in the ionosphere and thermosphere. The effect of those geomagnetic disturbances on the thermospheric wind can also be monitored by the ground-based Fabry-Perot spectrometers. These instruments as a whole provide us with an unprecedented opportunity for imaging the MIT system in 4-D and for investigating the electrodynamic coupling of the MIT system during geomagnetic disturbances.

This joint session proposal is a call for a multi-instrument observational campaign, requiring close collaborations between both GEM and CEDAR communities. It is timely because of the availability of simultaneous observations from multiple instruments, including those mentioned above and many other instruments and models. In addition, the joint GEM/CEDAR workshop this year will provide us with an excellent opportunity to kick off this interdisciplinary research initiative and a forum for presenting results, discussing solutions and exchanging ideas.