Community:Email 11jun09

From CedarWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent Jun 11, 2009. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) Second editiion of Kelley's book from Elsevier is available. Reply to Mike Kelley (mikek@ece.cornell.edu).

(2) CEDAR Worskhop announcements, 28 Jun - 02 Jul, Santa Fe, NM. See also http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu (click on Workshops, 2009, Workshop List, individual workshop).

(a) Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling, Monday, 29 June, 1-3 and 730-930 PM. Reply to Joshua Semeter (jls@bu.edu).

(b) Thermospheric and ionospheric effects of solar wind shocks and pressure pulses during the declining phase of solar cycle 23, Wednesday, 01 July, 4-6 PM. Reply to Delores Knipp (knipp@ucar.edu).


(1) Second edition of Kelley's book from Elsevier is available.


From Mike Kelley (mikek@ece.cornell.edu).

Elsevier announces the May 2009 publication of "The Earth's Ionosphere: Electrodynamics and Plasma Physics," 2nd edition, by Michael C. Kelley (ISBN 13: 978-0-12-088425-4, Vol. 96, International Geophysics Series). Copies may be ordered online from any book supplier, including Amazon and Borders. This hardback text retails for $89.99 but is currently priced at $71.96 on Amazon. Two new chapters have been added, one on the mesosphere including PMSE, sprites and mesospheric bores; and another detailing 20 years of new information on midlatitude processes. Problem sets are posted on the Elsevier website along with the appendices. Solutions are available to teachers.


(2) CEDAR Worskhop announcements, 28 Jun - 02 Jul, Santa Fe, NM. (a) Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling, Monday, 29 June, 1-3 and 730-930 PM.


From Joshua Semeter (jls@bu.edu).

CEDAR workshop session: Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Monday, June 29, 2009. Zia Room, 1-3pm and 7:30-9:30pm

Conveners: Josh Semeter (jls@bu.edu) and Bill Bristow (bill.bristow@gi.alaska.edu)

The physics of the magnetosphere and ionosphere are inexorably interconnected. This is particularly evident at high latitudes where magnetospheric disturbances, guided by the convergent field, serve to radically alter densities, temperatures, and flows in the ionosphere. These ionosphere-thermosphere responses, in turn, affect the composition and configuration of the magnetosphere via feedback in the form of mass outflow and the neutral wind dynamo. The study of M-I coupling via remote sensing has long been at the core of the CEDAR initiative. Recent years have witnessed significant advances in instrumentation, techniques, and analysis strategies in this area. The purpose of this workshop is to review the status of M-I coupling research within the CEDAR community, and to discuss ideas for future experiments and collaborations.

The scope is deliberately broad for these initial sessions. Participation is welcome in the form of brief presentations aimed at provoking discussion. Informal participation also welcome. If you would like to contribute formally, please email either Joshua Semeter (jls@bu.edu) or Bill Bristow (Bill.Bristow@gi.alaska.edu) with a brief description of your topic.


(2) CEDAR Worskhop announcements, 28 Jun - 02 Jul, Santa Fe, NM. (b) Thermospheric and ionospheric effects of solar wind shocks and pressure pulses during the declining phase of solar cycle 23, Wednesday, 01 July, 4-6 PM.


From Delores Knipp (knipp@ucar.edu).

During the declining phase of solar cycle 23, a number of new Ionosphere-Thermosphere (I-T) phenomena have been noted - high-speed streams in the solar wind leading to periodic fluctuations in the thermosphere, magnetic storms which have little, limited or unusual Dst signature, etc. This workshop solicits observational and modelling reports of the I-T system response to solar activity in the approach to solar minimum. We invite presentations and comparisons of the I-T response during the commencement, main and recovery storm phase. We are particularly interested in the role that traveling ionospheric and atmospheric disturbances play in storm time. For example are I-T disturbances more likely to develop if the magnetospheric storm is preceded by a solar wind shock? Examples of other questions that may be fruitfully addressed are: 1) What is the role of northward and/or in-the-ecliptic components of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on I-T disturbances? 2) What fraction of the energy deposition to the upper atmosphere is related to cusp region dynamics? 3) What are the roles and relative contributions of particles and Poynting flux deposition to the upper atmosphere? 4) How does localized, intense Poynting flux input affect the global thermosphere? 5) Can we offer better characterization of upper atmosphere energization than that provided by ground-based indices?

Please forward inquiries or brief presentations to Delores Knipp (knipp@ucar.edu) or Cheryl Huang (afrl.rvb.pa@hanscom.af.mil - please put convener name in subject line).