Community:Email 12jul13

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent 12 July 2013. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) Bishop’s Acronym Guide (B.A.G.) now available on CEDAR wiki and open for community input! From <Rebecca.L.Bishop at aero.org> or <xanthee at gmail.com>.

(2) Announcement of the 12th issue of the CAWSES-II TG4 newsletter is on-line. From Michi NISHIOKA <nishioka at nict.go.jp>. See also http://www.cawses.org/wiki/images/1/16/TG4_newsletter_issue12.pdf

(3) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (a) SA009: Gravity Wave Effects in the Mesosphere, Thermosphere, and Ionosphere.

From Sharon Vadas <vasha at cora.nwra.com>.

  • (b) SA010: High-latitude and Storm-Time Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Coupling.

From Bill Bristow <wabristow at alaska.edu>.

  • (c) SM03: Aurora Dynamics and Applications.

From <Yongliang.Zhang at jhuapl.edu>.


(1) Bishop’s Acronym Guide (B.A.G.) now available on CEDAR wiki and open for community input!


From <Rebecca.L.Bishop at aero.org> or <xanthee at gmail.com>.

Due to popular request the CEDAR acronym guide (B.A.G.) has been added to the CEDAR wiki pages. With over 1200 space science acronyms, it is an invaluable tool for both students and researchers. However, there are still many more acronyms that need to be included to cover the wide range of science phenomena, programs, and projects in our field.

We invite all members of the CEDAR, GEM, SHINE, SCOSTEP and other space science communities to add acronyms specific to space science in order to make it a comprehensive acronym resource. B.A.G. can be found at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/Community:Bishops_Acronym_Guide

To be added, acronyms must fall into one of the following categories:

1. Must be from a funded program (not proposed)

2. Have appeared in a published scientific journal

3. Sensors/instruments must either be built, collecting data, or funded

4. Name of an agency, formal funding program, lab, or center

5. Standard project/program management abbreviations (ex. DR: Design Review)

Persons with CEDAR wiki logins can add acronyms directly to the wiki page, while others can send them to Rebecca Bishop (xanthee@gmail.com), who also welcomes suggestions and comments.


(2) Announcement of the 12th issue of the CAWSES-II TG4 newsletter is on-line.


From Michi NISHIOKA <nishioka at nict.go.jp>.

The 12th CAWSES-II TG4 newsletter is issued. It can be downloaded from the CAWSES-II Wiki page at http://www.cawses.org/wiki/images/1/16/TG4_newsletter_issue12.pdf

In this issue, the following articles are included;

  • Article 1: Space Science Instrumentation in Africa: Past, Present, and Future (Dr. Yizengaw)
  • Article 2: Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) (Dr. Eastes et al.)
  • Article 3: Ionospheric Connection Explorer Selected by NASA (Dr. Immel)
  • Article 4: The 1st Antarctic Gravity Wave Instrument Network: ANGWIN Workshop (Dr. Ejiri et al.)
  • Highlights on Young Scientists: Characterization of Equatorial Kelvin Waves using the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC data (Dr. Uma Das)
  • Short News: Next SCOSTEP program (Dr. Shiokawa)
  • List of upcoming meetings

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter to your colleagues.

The purpose of this newsletter is to make more communications among scientists related to the CAWSES-II Task Group 4 (particularly between those of the atmosphere and the ionosphere). The editors would like to invite you to submit the following articles to the TG4 newsletter. Our newsletter has four categories of the articles:

  1. Articles: ~500 words and four figures (maximum) - on campaign, ground observations, satellite observations, modeling, workshop/conference/symposium report, etc
  2. Highlights on young scientists: ~200 words and two figures - on his/him own work related to CAWSES-TG4
  3. Short news: ~100 words - announcements of campaign, workshop, etc
  4. List of planned workshop

Category 2 (Highlights on young scientists) helps both young scientists and TG4 members to know each other. Please contact the editors for recommendation of young scientists who are willing to write an article on this category.

Your suggestions and comments on this newsletter are also very welcome. The next issue will be the final issue of our newsletter. Do not miss your chance!

Editor of CAWSES-II TG4 newsletter, Michi Nishioka (nishioka at nict.go.jp)


(3) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (a) SA009: Gravity Wave Effects in the Mesosphere, Thermosphere, and Ionosphere.

From Sharon Vadas <vasha at cora.nwra.com>.

We would like to invite you to submit an abstract in session SA009 at the fall AGU meeting 9-13 December 2013 in San Francisco, CA. The name of the session is "Gravity Wave Effects in the Mesosphere, Thermosphere, and Ionosphere".

A description of the session is: "Atmospheric gravity waves(GWs) are important to the mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere, wherein they transport energy and momentum, saturate/dissipate, and create TIDs. This can significantly alter the dynamics and characteristics of these regions. Abstracts are solicited on observational and modeling topics at all latitudes ranging from (a)GW excitation by sources in the troposphere and MTI, including deep convection, orography, aurora, tsunamis, wave breaking, geostrophic adjustment, body forcings/heatings, (b)The propagation, dissipation, and breaking of GWs in the MTI, including traveling atmospheric and ionospheric disturbances, and (c)Interactions of GWs with the mean flow as well as large-scale waves/tides."

Please submit your abstract online by the deadline, which is August 6.

Thank you! Sharon Vadas and Michael Nicolls (chairmen of session)


(3) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (b) SA010: High-latitude and Storm-Time Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Coupling.

From Bill Bristow <wabristow at alaska.edu>.

Contributions are invited to the Fall 2013 AGU meeting session SA010: High-latitude and Storm-Time Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Coupling

M-I-T coupling is a process that delivers solar-wind energy to the upper atmosphere and provides feedback to the magnetosphere, which becomes most dramatic during storm intervals when the amount of energy deposited and latitudinal extent greatly increase. Recent advances in ground and space-based instrumentation (RBSP, SuperDARN, GPS/TEC) enable observations of M-I-T coupling over a much broader range of geophysical conditions than was possible previously. Papers for this session can focus on M-I-T, M-I, or I-T coupling. We encourage contributions that examine storm-time intervals. Both space- and ground-based observations are encouraged. Modeling studies could be included, but they should be tied to observations.


Conveners:

William Bristow, Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, wabristow@alaska.edu

Mark Conde, Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, mark.conde@gi.alaska.edu

Aaron Riddley, University of Michigan, ridley@umich.edu

John Michael Ruohoniemi, Virginia Polytechnic University, mikeruo@vt.edu


(3) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (c) SM03: Aurora Dynamics and Applications.

From <Yongliang.Zhang at jhuapl.edu>.

We like to bring your attention to the AGU SM03 session which focuses on progresses in auroral related studies. Particle precipitations and auroras play one of the key roles in the coupling among the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Features in auroral dynamics, such as auroral spatial structures, time variations and different particle sources including electrons, ions and neutral atoms from the solar wind and magnetosphere, reveal important physical processes in the auroral oval, polar cap and other regions. The particles alter the ionosphere, have a strong feedback effect on the magnetosphere, and are one of the drivers for disturbances in the thermosphere. Contributions from data analysis, theory, and modeling that improve our current understanding of auroral morphology, particle sources, and their applications (such as aurora forecast, magnetospheric model validation, inputs to ionosphere and thermosphere simulations, radio scintillation, radar clutter, etc.) are all welcome.

Yongliang Zhang, Larry. J. Paxton, Robert Fear, and Romain Maggiolo