Community:Email 18apr13

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent 18 April 2013. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) Santimay Basu died Tuesday April 16, 2013. From emery at ucar.edu.

(2) NASA selects 2 CEDAR Explorer satellite projects - ICON and GOLD. From aburns at ucar.edu and emery at ucar.edu.

(3) 22-28 June CEDAR Workshop Schedule and Agenda. From emery at ucar.edu. See http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Agenda

(4) Research Astrophysicist job in Fields and Particles at Goddard Space Flight Center - applications due 9 May. From eftyhia.zesta at nasa.gov. See also http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/341914300 (GS-15) and http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/341914700 (GS-13/14).


(1) Santimay Basu died Tuesday April 16, 2013.


From emery at ucar.edu.

The CEDAR community is saddened by news of Santimay (Santi) Basu's death on Tuesday April 16 after suffering a cardiac arrest. He was a foremost researcher in the area of ionospheric scintillations. Our community grieves and extends deepest sympathy to his wife and our colleague, Sunanda Basu.


(2) NASA selects 2 CEDAR Explorer satellite projects - ICON and GOLD.


From aburns at ucar.edu and emery at ucar.edu.

Congratulations to the lead scientists of ICON (Tom Immel) and GOLD (Richard Eastes) from the CEDAR community who were selected by NASA for Explorer satellite projects. They will both speak about their projects at the CEDAR Workshop on Friday June 28 as listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Agenda in the agenda. What follows is the NASA announcement.

NASA SELECTS EXPLORER PROJECTS TO PROBE EARTH'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE WASHINGTON -- NASA has selected a new satellite mission and a new space-based instrument to begin development as part of the agency's Heliophysics Explorer Program. The projects will provide space observations to study Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. The Ionospheric Connection (ICON) mission, led by Thomas Immel of the University of California, Berkeley, will probe the extreme variability of Earth's ionosphere with in-situ and remote-sensing instruments. Fluctuations in the ionosphere interfere with signals from communications and global positioning satellites, which can have an economic impact on the nation. The Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) mission of opportunity, led by Richard Eastes of the University of Central Florida in Orlando, is an imaging instrument that will fly on a commercial communications satellite in geostationary orbit to image the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere. "One of the frontier areas of heliophysics is the study of the interface between outer space and the upper reaches of Earth's atmosphere," said John Grunsfeld, NASA associate administrator for science at NASA Headquarters, Washington. "These selected projects use innovative solutions to advance our knowledge of this relatively unexplored region. The two missions together will result in significantly more advances in our understanding of Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere than either would alone." These two Explorer projects were selected from proposals submitted in response to the NASA Explorer announcement of opportunity in 2010. The proposals were judged to offer the best science value and feasible development plans among the six concept studies submitted to NASA in September 2012. Costs for NASA Explorer missions, such as ICON, are capped at $200 million each (fiscal year 2011 dollars), excluding the launch vehicle. Explorer missions of opportunity, such as GOLD, are capped at $55 million each. The new missions are expected to launch in 2017. The Explorer program is the agency's oldest continuous program. It is designed to provide frequent, low-cost access to space for principal investigator-led space science investigations relevant to the heliophysics and astrophysics programs in NASA's Science Mission > Directorate in Washington. The Explorer program has launched more than 90 missions since 1958, including Explorer 1 which discovered the Earth's radiation belts and the Nobel Prize-enabling mission Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission. The program is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center for the Science Mission Directorate. For more information about the Explorer program, visit: http://explorers.gsfc.nasa.gov For information about NASA and space science, visit: http://www.nasa.gov


(3) 22-28 June CEDAR Workshop Schedule and Agenda.


From emery at ucar.edu.

The individual workshops have been scheduled for the 2013 CEDAR Workshop. Links to workshop descriptions are in the agenda at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Agenda and a condensed schedule for the workshops is at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:2013_Workshop_Agenda

As usual, there are conflicts, but thanks to the conveners and CSSC, we hope they are minimized. Many sessions will be of interest to the GEM community on Monday and Tuesday after the educational CEDAR-GEM Workshop organized on Saturday and Sunday by Larry Lyons and his committee.


(4) Research Astrophysicist job in Fields and Particles at Goddard Space Flight Center - applications due 9 May.


From eftyhia.zesta at nasa.gov.

Permanent Position available at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, for one position of Research Astrophysicist in Fields and Particles advertized at two levels of expertise.

The Sciences and Exploration Directorate, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory (Code 673) seeks a highly skilled individual to serve as a Research Astrophysicist. You will serve as a Research Astrophysicist with expertise in space plasma physics and focus in thermal plasma density, temperature, flow, and composition instrumentation technologies. You will perform observational and/or theoretical research in the physics of space plasmas.

This is a research position engaged in professional scientific work, directed toward discovering, disseminating, and applying new or expanded knowledge in space plasma physics. The results of investigation areas are of fundamental importance in determining the nature, magnitude, and interrelationships of space plasma densities, temperatures, and flow velocities, neutral atom fluxes, and other related phenomena and processes through the use of empirical, theoretical, or experimental means. Specifically, you will: propose successfully for research funding from appropriate sources as principal investigator or co-investigator for collaborative research; perform research that leads to presentations at major scientific meetings and to peer-reviewed publications; the research is at the leading edge of knowledge as defined by the appropriate research community; and you will assume personal responsibility for the conduct, presentation, and publication of this research. You will develop experimental investigations in problem areas recognized as being unyielding to research analysis and recognized as representing critical obstacles to scientific progress; you will conceive, plan, and conduct pioneering projects of outstanding scope, difficulty, and complexity in unexplored areas of investigation. You will serve as an instrument or mission team lead, determining the area of experimental investigation and plan of attack and ensure that the team achieves a significant rate of progress in completing agency projects. You will design or direct the development of unique or leading-edge technology, equipment, or instrumentation to meet specific mission/project requirements. This development shall include, but is not limited to, the design and development of experimental scientific instrumentation with the objective of determining the nature, magnitude, and interrelationships of space plasma densities, temperatures, flow velocities and composition, neutral atom fluxes, and/or other comparable phenomena and processes. PhD desired.

U.S. citizenship required. Position is being advertised at the GS-13/GS-14 and GS-15 grade levels (salary $89,033 - $155,500). Vacant research positions may be filled at one of several grade levels depending upon the scientific impact of the person selected. To view the full vacancy announcements which contain further information, including qualification requirements and how to apply go to http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/341914300 (GS-15) and http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/341914700 (GS-13/14). Applications must be received by May 9th, 2013. For information about the research program and position, please contact Eftyhia Zesta, Chief of the Geospace Physics Laboratory, at 301-286-6492, or by e-mail at Eftyhia.Zesta@nasa.gov.

NASA, GSFC is an Equal Opportunity Employer.