Community:Email 19jul13b

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent 19 July 2013. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) February 10-14, 2014, Chapman Conference on Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Solar System, Yosemite National Park, CA, USA. From: Charles Chappell <rick.chappell at vanderbilt.edu> in SPA Newsletter 18 July. See also http://chapman.agu.org/magnetosphere/

(2) NCAR/CISL invites Large Allocation Requests by 16 September. From: Michael Wiltberger <wiltbemj at ucar.edu>. See also http://www2.cisl.ucar.edu/docs/allocations and https://www2.cisl.ucar.edu/resources/yellowstone

(3) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (a) SA12: Low and High Latitude Ionospheric Irregularities and Scintillations Studies Conducted During the Last 50 Years.

From: Cesar Valladares <cesar.valladares at bc.edu>.

  • (b) SH12: Scientific Aspects of Space Weather Forecasting.

From Tony Mannucci <anthony.j.mannucci at jpl.nasa.gov>.


(1) February 10-14, 2014, Chapman Conference on Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Solar System, Yosemite National Park, CA, USA.


From: Charles Chappell <rick.chappell at vanderbilt.edu> in SPA Newsletter 18 July.

Over the half century of exploration of the Earth’s space environment, it has become evident that the interaction between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere plays a dominant role in the evolution and dynamics of magnetospheric plasmas and fields. It is now being found that this same interaction is of importance at other planets and moons throughout the solar system. This AGU Chapman conference will examine the details of the coupling processes using results from both measurements and modeling.

The main goal of this cross-discipline conference is to enhance the understanding of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes by researchers in both the heliophysics and planetary science communities. The science has advanced to the point of actually being able to approach the modeling of the entire coupled system. However, there remains a continuing important challenge to encourage the connection of research by scientists who study the Earth’s ionosphere and magnetosphere and those who explore the extra- terrestrial planetary environments. We will schedule sessions on observations and modeling of the properties of the ionosphere and magnetosphere with a push toward an overall merged model that can match the observations of the coupled system both at the Earth and other planets and moons.

Topics that will be discussed include the ionosphere as a source of magnetospheric plasma, the effects of the low energy ionospheric plasma on the behavior of the more energetic plasmas, the role of currents and electric/magnetic fields in coupling the two regions, the unified global modeling of the ionosphere and magnetosphere at Earth, and the coupling and modeling of the ionosphere and magnetosphere at other planets and moons in the solar system. This conference is planned to occur on the 40th anniversary of the initial magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling conference that took place at Yosemite National Park in 1974 giving a four decade perspective of the progress in understanding these fundamental processes.

The meeting is expected to have 75-85 attendees and will consist of invited and contributed papers as well as a poster session. Student attendance is encouraged. The Co-Conveners are Bob Schunk, Andy Nagy, Rick Chappell, Peter Banks, Jim Burch and Dan Baker. For further information about the conference go to the AGU Chapman Conference website http://chapman.agu.org/magnetosphere/. For specific questions contact Rick Chappell at rick.chappell@vanderbilt.edu or Andy Nagy at anagy@umich.edu.


(2) NCAR/CISL invites Large Allocation Requests by 16 September.


From: Michael Wiltberger <wiltbemj at ucar.edu>.

NCAR/CISL invites NSF-supported university researchers in the atmospheric, oceanic, and related sciences to submit large allocation requests for the Yellowstone system by September 16, 2013. All requesters are strongly encouraged to review the instructions before preparing their submissions.

These requests will be reviewed by the CISL High-performance computing Advisory Panel (CHAP), and there must be a direct linkage between the NSF award and the computational research being proposed. Please visit http://www2.cisl.ucar.edu/docs/allocations for more university allocation instructions and opportunities.

Allocations will be made on Yellowstone, NCAR's 1.5-petaflops IBM iDataPlex system; the data analysis and visualization clusters (Geyser and Caldera); the 11-petabyte GLADE disk resource, and the High Performance Storage System (HPSS) archive. Please see https://www2.cisl.ucar.edu/resources/yellowstone for more system details.

For the Yellowstone resource, a large allocation is any request for more than 200,000 core-hours. Researchers with needs for up to 200,000 core-hours can apply for Small University Allocations at any time. Small allocations are also recommended for researchers who are new to Yellowstone, in order to conduct benchmarking and test runs before submitting large allocation requests.

Contact: Dave Hart, NCAR/CISL 303-497-1234, dhart@ucar.edu

SERVICES AFFECTED CISL Status Yellowstone

PRIMARY CONTACT CISL Help Desk Team (HDT) usshelpdesk@ucar.edu (303) 497-2400

SECONDARY CONTACTS Dave Hart dhart@ucar.edu 303-497-1234


(3) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (a) SA12: Low and High Latitude Ionospheric Irregularities and Scintillations Studies Conducted During the Last 50 Years.

From: Cesar Valladares <cesar.valladares at bc.edu>.

We invite members of the CEDAR community to submit abstracts to participate in

session SA012 during the Fall AGU meeting to remember and honor our friend and 

colleague Dr. Santimay Basu. Dr. Basu was currently contributing his expertise as a research physicist at Boston College after completing an illustrious career in the Ionospheric Physics Division of the Air Force Research Laboratory. During his extensive creative career Dr. Basu made many important contributions to the physics of space plasmas. He developed methods to assess and measure the detrimental effects of space plasma irregularities on EM signals used for communication and navigation systems. He studied the conditions that permit plasma irregularities to grow at low, mid and high latitudes. He further published on the physics of the ionosphere during disturbed conditions and ionospheric modification experiments using powerful radars. We welcome presentations that continue and build upon his legacy in all these areas of physics. This session is to honor Dr. Basu a unique professor, scientific force, treasured colleague and kind gentle dear friend.

The name of the session is: Low and high latitude ionospheric irregularities and scintillations studies conducted during the last 50 years.

Conveners: Cesar E. Valladares, Boston College, USA, Herbert C. Carlson, Utah State University, USA, Patricia Doherty and Endawoke Yizengaw, Boston College, USA

Description: During the last 50 years many important contributions have greatly advanced the field of ionospheric irregularities and structures that commonly develop at high and low latitudes. Radars, satellites, ground-based receivers, airglow imagers and other instruments have been used to understand the dynamics and evolution of ionospheric irregularities and its seeding mechanisms. We welcome presentations that review how studies of scintillation plasma structures and plasma modifications experiments have evolved during the last 5 decades, what has been learnt, and outline how we should proceed to resolve the most currently salient issues on forecasting the initiation of scintillations.


(3) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (b) SH12: Scientific Aspects of Space Weather Forecasting.

From Tony Mannucci <anthony.j.mannucci at jpl.nasa.gov>.

Dear Colleagues,

Spiro, Tamas and I are organizing a special session at the Fall AGU focused on scientific aspects of space weather forecasting. The session description is below. Please give this session your serious consideration. We welcome your contribution.

The abstract deadline is August 6, 2013. We look forward to your positive response. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Tony Mannucci, JPL, Spiro Antiochos, NASA Goddard, Tamas Gombosi, University of Michigan

Session SH012, co-sponsors SM, SA

Session title: Scientific Aspects of Space Weather Forecasting

Description: New satellite-based observations and physics-based models encompassing the solar corona to Earth’s upper atmosphere are advancing space weather science. SDO and STEREO provide comprehensive measurements of the structure and dynamics of solar drivers, and the Van Allen Probes are measuring manifestations of space weather at Earth. Solar-heliosphere models recently transitioned to operations are permitting 1-4 day advance warning of disturbances. Yet, enormous scientific challenges remain in understanding and forecasting space weather. We invite presentations covering fundamental science, modeling, and observations in the solar, heliosphere, magnetosphere and upper atmosphere domains. Talks addressing forecasting complex phenomena are welcome.