Community:Email 19mar10

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent Mar 19, 2010. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) On-line registration open for Boulder, CO 2010 CEDAR Workshop 20-25 June. Reply to Barbara Emery (emery@ucar.edu). See also http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu ('Workshops','2010 Workshop','Register').

(2) Update on the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) Budgets for 2010 and 2011 From: Doug Biesecker <Doug.Biesecker at noaa.gov>. See also http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2010/20100201_budget.html.

(3) 19-23 Jul or 2-6 Aug, NASA Planetary Science Summer School, JPL, CA. Applications due 1 May. From NSPIRES_Help@nasaprs.com. See also http://pscischool.jpl.nasa.gov.

(4) 28 Jul - 4 Aug 2010, Heliophysics Summer School, Boulder, CO, Applications due 1 April. From: Susanne Demaree (sdemaree at ucar.edu). See also http://www.vsp.ucar.edu/HeliophysicsScience/.

(5) Scientific Programmer/Analyst/Research Associate Job at ASTRA in Boulder, CO. From: S M Irfan Azeem <iazeem at astraspace.net>. See also http://www.astraspace.net.

(6) Visiting Appointment at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, due April 1. From SPA Newsletter 5 March. From: Roman Makarevich <R.Makarevich at latrobe.edu.au>. See also http://www.latrobe.edu.au/spacescience/.

(7) The 6th IAGA/ICMA/CAWSES workshop on "Long-Term Changes and Trends in the Atmosphere" - Abstract deadline: April 1, 2010. From: Liying Qian <lqian at ucar.edu>. See also http://www.hao.ucar.edu/TREND2010/index.php.

(8) 2010 Space Weather Workshop Reminder - Registration Deadline, April 2. From: Thomas Peltzer <Thomas.Peltzer at noaa.gov>. See also http://www.spaceweather.gov/sww.

(9) 8-13 August 2010, AGU Meeting of the Americas, Foz do Iguazu, Brazil. Abstracts due 31 March at http://www.agu.org/meetings/ja10/.

(a) A05: Connecting Atmospheric and Space Sciences: Solar Variability and Climate Reply to Janet U Kozyra <jukozyra at umich.edu>.

(b) SA03: Aeronomy Studies in Latin America. Reply to Francisco Azpilicueta <f.azpilicueta at yahoo.com.ar>.

(c) SA09: The Equatorial Ionosphere/Thermosphere System. Reply to Fabiano Rodrigues <frodrigues at astraspace.net>.

(d) SM04: Multipoint Perspectives of Space Plasma. Reply to David Gary Sibeck <david.g.sibeck at nasa.gov>.

(e) SM06: The Magnetosphere/Ionosphere as a Coupled System: Modelling and Observational Results. Reply to Pedrina Dos Santos <pterra at naic.edu>.


(1) On-line registration open for Boulder, CO 2010 CEDAR Workshop 20-25 June.


From Barbara Emery (emery at ucar.edu).

On-line registration is now open for the 2010 CEDAR Workshop in Boulder, Colorado starting with the Student Workshop on Sunday 20 June and ending on Friday 25 June. Register on the CEDAR wiki site at:

       http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu

Click on 'Workshops', '2010 Workshop', 'Register', and finally on '2010 CEDAR Workshop On-Line Registration'.

New registrants will be assigned wiki logins (FName or first initial, last name) so they can upload their presentations or whatever. CEDAR Database users or previous CEDAR Workshop attendees since 2007 already have a CEDAR wiki login. The wiki login list is under 'Toolbox', 'Special pages', and 'User list'.

Students should register by Friday 14 May, non-students by 28 May to avoid a $75 late fee. Student rooms are at the Williams Village dorm (sign up on the registration form), although non-students are also welcome. All students receive free lodging at the dorm, and students from US universities also receive round-trip air fare to Denver, Colorado. The CEDAR rate at the Millenium Hotel is $124/night including breakfast. This rate is only good until Thursday 20 May at 5 PM MDT, after which the rate becomes the prevailing hotel rate. Poster abstracts are due on-line via editing the registration form by Friday 14 May.


(2) Update on the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) Budgets for 2010 and 2011


From: Doug Biesecker <Doug.Biesecker at noaa.gov>.

A few weeks ago the President’s proposed FY11 (fiscal year 2011) budget was released. (For NOAA see: http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2010/20100201_budget.html) This step in the budget process, prompts us to inform the space science community about the good news for the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, the customers we serve, and the partnerships we value.

1. FY10: NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center received a $2.7 M increase to our base budget. This will enable us to move forward with the transition of models into operations.

2. FY11: the President’s proposed budget includes:

a. An increase of $2.0 M to SWPC’s base budget enabling improvements needed for future information technology security, and

b. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) – NOAA requests an increase of $9,500,000 and a total life cycle cost of $85,100,000 to initiate refurbishment of the DSCOVR satellite, formerly known as Triana, and development of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) imager to maintain continuity of solar wind data used for geomagnetic storm warnings

Getting to this level in the budget process for an L1 monitor is a big step forward for NOAA. If approved in the final budget, and working with our AF and NASA partners, it will put us on a path towards ensuring future coronagraph and solar wind observations. Hopefully, this will be the first step in recognizing that continuous measurements are needed from L1 for operations (and for science as well).

c. Finally, the budget includes support for new and continuing space weather observations from NOAA geostationary and polar satellites, and from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate-2 (COSMIC-2) program.


(3) 19-23 Jul or 2-6 Aug, NASA Planetary Science Summer School, JPL, CA. Applications due 1 May.


From NSPIRES_Help@nasaprs.com.

NASA is accepting applications from science and engineering post-docs, recent PhDs, and doctoral students for its 22nd Annual Planetary Science Summer School, which will hold two separate sessions this summer (19-23 July and 2-6 August) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. During the program, student teams will carry out the equivalent of an early mission concept study, prepare a proposal authorization review presentation, present it to a review board, and receive feedback. At the end of the week, students will have a clearer understanding of the life cycle of a robotic space mission; relationships between mission design, cost, and schedule; and the tradeoffs necessary to stay within cost and schedule while preserving the quality of science. Applications are due 1 May 2010. Partial financial support is available for a limited number of individuals. Further information is available at http://pscischool.jpl.nasa.gov.


(4) 28 Jul - 4 Aug 2010, Heliophysics Summer School, Boulder, CO, Applications due 1 April.


From: Susanne Demaree (sdemaree at ucar.edu).

Applications are invited for the 2010 Heliophysics Summer School, to be held in Boulder, Colorado. NASA Living With a Star sponsors the program, and it is hosted by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Visiting Scientist Programs.

The Summer School has two principal aims:

  1. to deepen the appreciation of the basic science of heliophysics for a select

group of students; and

  1. expand the newly-published textbook series to include labs, problem sets, and

more background material.

The 2010 program will focus on teaching graduate level students and first or second year postdoctoral fellows the fundamentals of heliophysics along with the cause and effects of space storms. The first two textbook volumes will be used as teaching tools:

  1. Heliophysics I Plasma Physics of the Local Cosmos
  2. Heliophysics II: Space Storms and Radiation: Causes and Effects

Approximately 30 students will be selected through a competitive process organized by UCAR to participate in the summer school. Each participant will receive air travel, lodging and per diem. The 2010 summer school deans are Drs. Amitava Bhattacharjee (University of New Hampshire), Dana Longcope (Montana State University-Bozeman), and Jan Sojka (Utah State University). A successful candidate should:

  1. Be an enrolled graduate student in any phase of training or first or second

year postdoctoral fellow

  1. Major in physics with an emphasis on astrophysics, geophysics, plasma physics,

and space physics, or have research experience in at least one of these areas

  1. Plan to pursue a career in heliophysics or astrophysics

Application materials required:

  1. A cover letter briefly stating motivation for application
  2. Curriculum vitae with a list of publications, technical reports and

professional presentations

  1. One letter of reference from advisor
  2. Graduate school transcripts
  3. One to two page Statement of Interest and relevance to summer school goals

Applications may be sent electronically to:vsp@ucar.edu. VSP also accepts applications mailed to:

UCAR Visiting Scientist Programs, Heliophysics Summer Schools, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000

Please call 303-497-8649 with questions and/or visit http://www.vsp.ucar.edu/HeliophysicsScience/

NASA Living With a Star, Heliophysics Division sponsors this program. UCAR is an EE/AAE who values and encourages diversity in the workplace.


(5) Scientific Programmer/Analyst/Research Associate Job at ASTRA in Boulder, CO.


From: S M Irfan Azeem <iazeem at astraspace.net>.

Atmospheric & Space Technology Research Associates, LLC has an immediate opening in its Boulder, CO office for a scientific programmer/analyst or research associate with strong computer skills and a background in physics or engineering, to support multiple projects related to Space Physics. The work will include running large computer models of the space environment, data analysis and visualization, and related tasks in a cooperative team environment.

Qualifications: Ph.D or MS (with 2-3 years experience) in space physics, engineering, physics or related discipline is required. Excellent software skills in C++, Fortran and IDL for scientific applications on UNIX/Linux systems required. Proficiency in scientific data analysis and visualization is required. Experience in scientific algorithm development, modeling and simulation is preferred. Experience with parallel computing and/or scripting will be a plus.


Interested candidates should forward their resumes and the names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of at least three references to:

Dr. Geoff Crowley, Atmospheric & Space Technology Research Associates, LLC, 12703 Spectrum Drive, San Antonio, TX 78249, gcrowley@astraspace.net, http://www.astraspace.net

ASTRA offers a competitive salary and benefits package and is an EEO employer.


(6) Visiting Appointment at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, due April 1.


From: Roman Makarevich <R.Makarevich at latrobe.edu.au>.

Visiting Fellow: A visiting fellowship in the Space Physics Group is available at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. The visiting fellowship would be for up to 3 months in 2010 and may include some teaching in the Department of Physics. The visiting fellow is expected to contribute to ongoing research activities in Space Physics. Current research interests in Space Physics are Solar-Terrestrial Physics and Space Plasma Physics but the preference will be given to those with experience in magnetospheric and ionospheric physics. Experimental facilities include the TIGER SuperDARN radars, ionospheric sounders and optical spectrometers in Antarctica.

Information about the Space Physics Group is available at http://www.latrobe.edu.au/spacescience/.

To apply, send a 1-2 page summary of research interests and goals, curriculum vitae, complete bibliography, and the names of three references to:


Dr Roman Makarevich, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, VICTORIA 3086, AUSTRALIA, Email: r.makarevich@latrobe.edu.au

For more information, email r.makarevich@latrobe.edu.au. Applications will be reviewed starting April 1, 2010.


(7) The 6th IAGA/ICMA/CAWSES workshop on "Long-Term Changes and Trends in the Atmosphere" - Abstract deadline: April 1, 2010.


From: Liying Qian <lqian at ucar.edu>.

The 6th IAGA/ICMA/CAWSES workshop on "Long-Term Changes and Trends in t he Atmosphere" (http://www.hao.ucar.edu/TREND2010/index.php) will be held at National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Center Green Conference Center, Boulder, Colorado, USA, June15-18, 2010, the week before the 2010 CEDAR (Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions) workshop, which will also be held in Boulder.

Long-term changes to Earth's atmosphere are becoming more and more relevant to the future of our world and it is paramount that we quantify and understand changes occurring at all levels within the coupled atmospheric system. The increasing concentration of greenhouse gases, stratospheric ozone depletion, varying solar and geomagnetic activity, secular change of Earth's magnetic field, and changing dynamics propagating up from the troposphere are some of the possible causes of long-term changes in the stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere. The goals of this workshop are to review the current state of knowledge about trends in these atmospheric regions, and to discuss what research is necessary for resolving inconsistencies, reducing uncertainties, and achieving a deeper understanding of middle and upper atmospheric climate change, especially the relative influences of anthropogenic and solar effects.

We welcome papers using all types of observational techniques to determine the long-term changes and trends that have occurred in the past and also to determine the processes behind those changes. We also welcome contributions which consider the availability, quality and acquisition of various data sets which may be exploited for trend studies, and statistical methods for deriving and validating those trends. Interpretation and attribution of observational results depends heavily on theoretical models and numerical simulations of the trends, and presentations dealing with these topics are particularly welcome. While the troposphere is not the main focus of the workshop, it is clear that it has a major role to play in middle and upper atmosphere trends; papers that demonstrate this relevance are also welcome.

We are glad that this workshop coincides with the 40th year of uninterrupted work of Ray Roble, who has made substantial contributions in the topic which became a major theme of the workshop. It has been 20 years since Roble and Dickinson [1989] first concluded that global change will occur in the upper atmosphere as well as in the lower atmosphere as a result of increased greenhouse gas concentrations. Since this workshop will be held at NCAR where Ray has worked for nearly 40 years, a symposium in honor of Ray Roble will be held on 18 June, 2010 in conjunction with the workshop, to celebrate Dr. Roble's pioneering contributions to solar-terrestrial research (http://www.hao.ucar.edu/TREND2010/RobleSymposium.php).

http://www.hao.ucar.edu/TREND2010/index.php. Contacts: Liying Qian (lqian@ucar.edu).


(8) 2010 Space Weather Workshop Reminder - Registration Deadline, April 2.


From: Thomas Peltzer <Thomas.Peltzer at noaa.gov>.

The 2010 Space Weather Workshop will be held, April 27 - 30, in Boulder, Colorado. This meeting will bring customers, forecasters, commercial providers, international space weather service providers, and researchers together with the relevant government agencies to discuss a variety of space weather issues.

The workshop will focus on impacts of space weather, various forecasting techniques, and recent scientific advances in specifying and predicting conditions in the space environment. The agenda highlights space weather impacts in several areas, including ionospheric disturbances, geomagnetic storms and their solar drivers, radiation belts, and solar energetic particles.

The presentations and discussions seek to identify the highest priority for operational services that can guide future research and new high-value capabilities that can be transitioned into operations. Representatives from industries impacted by space weather will attend, including those from commercial airlines, electric power, emergency response, satellite operations, and navigation/communication.

Space Weather Workshop 2010 is co-organized by the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, the NSF Division of Atmospheric Sciences, and the NASA Heliophysics Division and the Space Radiation Analysis Group.

Further details regarding the meeting agenda and registration will be posted on our web site: http://www.spaceweather.gov/sww.


(9) 8-13 August 2010, AGU Meeting of the Americas, Foz do Iguazu, Brazil. Abstracts due 31 March at http://www.agu.org/meetings/ja10/. (a) A05: Connecting Atmospheric and Space Sciences: Solar Variability and Climate


Conveners: Natasha Andronova <natand@umich.edu>, Janet Kozyra <jukozyra@umich.edu>.

Invited Program:


Mark Badwin (NWRA), Guy Brasseur (NCAR, CSC), John Fontenla (University of Colorado LASP)

Description:


An understanding of the Earth's climate system is required to predict future states. Long-standing questions remain about the linkages between solar variability and climate change. This session focuses on new information gained in the last solar cycles (SC 20 - SC 24) about solar magnetic and irradiance variations, atmospheric consequences of space weather and cosmic rays, their impacts on Earth's climate system directly or through coupling and feedback processes. This session is to bring together solar, space and atmospheric researchers pursuing different aspects of this important problem.


(b) SA03: Aeronomy Studies in Latin America.


This session will focus on existing and planned research efforts that deal with ionospheric structures and instabilities and with coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere in the Latin-American region. Understanding atmospheric coupling is crucial to improve our knowledge of the ionospheric response to Space Weather and energy transfer via gravity, tidal and planetary waves. The maximum departure between magnetic and geographic equator and strong magnetic declination variations take place in this region that provides wide latitudinal coverage to allow the study of processes driven by equatorial, low and mid latitude dynamics.

Conveners:

Carlos R Martinis - Center for Space Physics (martinis@bu.edu),

Roderick A Heelis - University of Texas at Dallas (heelis@utdallas.edu),

Inez Staciarini Batista – INPE (inez@dae.inpe.br),

Francisco Azpilicueta – Universidad Nacional de La Plata (azpi@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar).


(c) SA09: The Equatorial Ionosphere/Thermosphere System.


Conveners: Odile de La Beaujardiere, David Hysell, Fabiano Rodrigues <frodrigues at astraspace.net>.

We would like to invite contributions for the session "The Equatorial Ionosphere/Thermosphere System" of the 2010 AGU Meeting of the Americas to be held in Foz do Iguassu, Brazil on August 8-13. We welcome contributions related to both observational and theoretical advances on low-latitude ionosphere/thermosphere. A description of the session is provided:

This session will emphasize observations and modeling advances of the low-latitude ionosphere and its coupling to the solar wind and lower atmosphere. The present solar minimum is the lowest since 100 years, and we also seek presentations related to solar minimum conditions. In particular we solicit abstracts that highlight observations from the C/NOFS satellite, as well as from other satellites and from ground sensors. Observations from solar minimum conditions are crucial to characterize the ground-state of the equatorial regions and to understand the relative role of the various drivers.


(d) SM04: Multipoint Perspectives of Space Plasma.


Conveners: Walter Gonzalez, James Spann, Matt Taylor, and David Sibeck <david.g.sibeck at nasa.gov>.

This session will be devoted to correlative studies involving theory, simulation, spacecraft, and ground observations.

Description: Recent space science missions have moved from single to multipoint measurements, such as STEREO, Cluster, and THEMIS who have enabled global and local plasma processes to be examined in 3D. This session will focus on utilization of multipoint measurements to investigate space plasma physics processes and phenomena from the sun to the ionosphere, and will highlight new science and increased knowledge of space plasma from recent missions. Encouraged are studies using space and ground based observations, remote and in situ observations, analysis tools for visualization, simulations, and submissions relating to the future direction of space plasma science.


(e) SM06: The Magnetosphere/Ionosphere as a Coupled System: Modelling and Observational Results.


Conveners: MICHAEL H DENTON, Lancaster University, +44 1524 510544, m.denton@lancaster.ac.uk

PEDRINA M SANTOS, Arecibo Observatory, Atmospheric Group, (787) 878-2612, pterra@naic.edu

Much research is currently being focused on so-called 'system science' i.e. the treatment of geospace as a system coupled across multiple energy scales and multiple spatial scales, and driven by the solar wind. This focus is largely due to a realisation that it is impossible to fully understand the evolution of components within geospace without knowledge of the interactions, coupling, and feedback from other parts of the system. We solicit experimental and modelling results which consider coupling across multiple spatial scales and multiple energies within geospace as a result of solar wind driving.