Community:Email 20jul11

From CedarWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent 20 July 2011. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) New SCOSTEP Executive Officers From Marianna Shepherd <mshepher at yorku.ca>.

(2) 5-9 December 2011, Fall AGU meeting, San Francisco, CA - abstracts due on-line 4 August. See also http://www.agu.org/meetings/

  • (a) SA02: Advances in Geospace Research from Antarctica.

From: Irfan Azeem <iazeem@astraspace.net>.

  • (b) SA05: Drivers of the Equatorial Ionospheric Climatology, Variability, and Irregularities

From: Fabiano Rodrigues <frodrigues@astraspace.net>.

  • (c) SA08: Recent Progress in Measuring and Modeling Thermospheric Neutral Winds

From: Jonathan Makela <jmakela@illinois.edu>

  • (d) GC42: Climate Change and the Sun 1. Quantifying the Solar-Terrestrial

System Contribution to Global Change From: Howard Singer <Howard.Singer@noaa.gov>

  • (e) GC44: Climate Change and the Sun 3. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability: Observations and Implications

From: Marty Snow <Marty.Snow@lasp.colorado.edu>


(1) New SCOSTEP Executive Officers


From Marianna Shepherd <mshepher at yorku.ca>.

At its meeting on July 3, 2011 in Melbourne, Australia the General Council of the Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP) held an election for new SCOSTEP Executive Officers, President and Vice-President.

It is my pleasure to inform you that the new SCOSTEP President is Dr. Natchimuthuk (Nat) Gopalswamy, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar System Exploration Division (USA) (gopals@ssedmail.gsfc.nasa.gov). The new SCOSTEP Vice-President is Prof. Franz-Josef Lübken, Director, Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics (Germany) (luebken@iap-kborn.de).

Sincerely, Marianna Shepherd, Scientific Secretary, SCOSTEP


(2) 5-9 December 2011, Fall AGU meeting, San Francisco, CA - abstracts due on-line 4 August. See also http://www.agu.org/meetings/

  • (a) SA02: Advances in Geospace Research from Antarctica.

From: Irfan Azeem <iazeem@astraspace.net>.

Dear Colleagues,



We encourage you to submit an abstract to the 2011 Fall AGU Meeting session SA02: Advances in Geospace Research from Antarctica. A brief description of our session is below.


Antarctica provides a unique natural laboratory for a variety of research dedicated to studying the Earth’s atmosphere, its space environment, and solar-terrestrial interactions with an overarching goal to improve our understanding of the mechanisms which couple solar processes to the polar geospace environment. These include investigations of auroras, induced electrical currents, space weather, geomagnetic fields, ionosphere, temperature and winds in the neutral atmosphere, and atmospheric waves. This session solicits papers on recent advances in space physics and aeronomy focusing on the Antarctic region. Inter-hemispheric and conjugacy studies as well as studies incorporating Antarctic observations in the global context are also welcome.

The dates of the meeting are 5-9 December. Abstract submission is now open, and it closes on 4 August. Please see http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/ for more details. If you have any questions, please contact the conveners below.

Best Regards,


Irfan Azeem, ASTRA LLC, iazeem@astraspace.net

Allan Weatherwax, Siena College, aweatherwax.edu


Mike Taylor, Utah State University, mike.taylor@usu.edu


Yusuke Ebihara, RISH, Kyoto University, ebihara@rish.kyoto-u.ac.jp


(2) 5-9 December 2011, Fall AGU meeting, San Francisco, CA - abstracts due on-line 4 August. See also http://www.agu.org/meetings/

  • (b) SA05: Drivers of the Equatorial Ionospheric Climatology, Variability, and Irregularities

From: Fabiano Rodrigues <frodrigues@astraspace.net>.

Description: Satellite and ground-based observations have revealed that the equatorial ionosphere responds differently at different longitude sectors to influences from the neutral atmosphere and from high latitudes. This session aims to understand the cause and effect relationships between the ionosphere, atmosphere and magnetosphere through data analysis and modeling. We welcome papers that shed light on the physical processes relevant to understanding equatorial electrodynamics and coupling processes in these different regions, and that improve our ability to unravel the variability of the equatorial ionosphere with longitude, season, and magnetic activity, and to forecast ionospheric scintillation and ambient density

Convener(s):

1. Odile de la Beaujardiere, Air Force Research Laboratory, odile.delabeaujardiere@us.af.mil

2. Endawoke Yizengaw, Boston Cllg-Scientific Research, kassie@bc.edu

3. Hyosub Kil, Johns Hopkins University, hyosub.kil@jhuapl.edu

4. Fabiano Rodrigues, ASTRA, frodrigues@astraspace.net


(2) 5-9 December 2011, Fall AGU meeting, San Francisco, CA - abstracts due on-line 4 August. See also http://www.agu.org/meetings/

  • (c) SA08: Recent Progress in Measuring and Modeling Thermospheric Neutral Winds

From: Jonathan Makela <jmakela@illinois.edu>

We are now accepting abstract submissions to session SA08, "Recent Progress in Measuring and Modeling Thermospheric Neutral Winds", a description of which is below. Abstracts are due by Aug 4, 2011 and can be submitted via http://agu-fm11.abstractcentral.com/ Please contact one of the session conveners with any questions.

Regards,

Jonathan Makela (jmakela@illinois.edu)

Andrew Gerrard (gerrard@njit.edu)

John Meriwether (john.meriwether@ces.clemson.edu)


SA08: Recent Progress in Measuring and Modeling Thermospheric Neutral Winds

The neutral winds are crucial to the dynamics of both the thermosphere and ionosphere. Fully understanding tides and gravity wave contributions in the thermosphere are especially important. Several new ground- and satellite-based experiments have been implemented or proposed to address the lack of measurements of thermospheric neutral winds. Advanced models are making progress in simulating both the climatology and daily trend of this important parameter. This session solicits contributions describing both experimental and modeling results of thermospheric neutral winds and their effects. Papers describing data analysis techniques and data-model comparisons are also welcome.


(2) 5-9 December 2011, Fall AGU meeting, San Francisco, CA - abstracts due on-line 4 August. See also http://www.agu.org/meetings/

  • (d) GC42: Climate Change and the Sun 1. Quantifying the Solar-Terrestrial

System Contribution to Global Change


From: Howard Singer <Howard.Singer@noaa.gov>

We would like to encourage participation in a Special Session in AGU's Global Environmental Change section co-sponsored by Atmospheric Sciences (A), Hydrology (H), and SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics (SH).

Additional information can be found at the AGU website: http://www.agu.org/meetings/

Abstract: The contribution of solar-terrestrial (ST) system variability to Earth¹s Global Change has generated much discussion in large part because it is difficult to assess and it crosses research disciplines. Investigations to quantify the magnitude and time scales of the ST variability influence on the Earth System will help elucidate mechanisms linked with Global Change and further understanding of the nature of our home in space. This multi-disciplinary session solicits papers addressing the magnitude and time-scale contributions of the ST system to Global Change in the context of its other known sources. Observation, model, and theory results that compare and quantify ST influences on specific time scales are encouraged.

Co-Chairs: Jack A. Kaye, Barbara L. Giles, Howard J. Singer, Peter Pilewskie, James F. Spann


(2) 5-9 December 2011, Fall AGU meeting, San Francisco, CA - abstracts due on-line 4 August.

  • (e) GC44: Climate Change and the Sun 3. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability: Observations and Implications

From: Marty Snow <Marty.Snow@lasp.colorado.edu>

Dear Colleagues,

Please consider submitting an abstract to GC44: Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability: Observations and Implications for the Fall AGU meeting. Invited authors are Gerard Thuillier, Caspar Ammann, Jan Sojka, and Aimee Merkel. The full session description is included below. Don’t forget that abstracts are due by August 4th this year!

Conveners: Marty Snow, Erik Richard, Frank Eparvier, and Rodney Viereck

Continuous observations of the spectrally-resolved solar irradiance now extend over more than half a solar cycle in the visible and infrared and up to three solar cycles at shorter wavelengths. The amplitude and phase of solar spectral irradiance variability as a function of wavelength can have significant impact on the atmosphere in both the long-term (climate) and short-term (space weather).

Observations of the atmosphere, such as ozone measurements, can play a key role in helping us to understand the Sun-Earth system. Solar spectral irradiance measurements from current missions such as the Solar Dynamics Observatory, SOLar Radiation and Climate Experiment, SOL-ACES, SOLSPEC, etc. are particularly relevant to this session.

Long-term variability records are by nature a composite of measurements from a series of instruments, and the uncertainties in the data must be well understood in order to make meaningful comparisons from one solar cycle to the next.

We solicit papers on both the measurement of solar spectral irradiance on all timescales and on atmospheric measurements or models that show the Sun's influence.