Community:Email 20jun11

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent 20 June 2011. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) PhD Studentships in Solar System Science at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Katlenburg-Lindau and the Universities of Goettingen and Braunschweig, Germany. From Dieter Schmitt <info@solar-system-school.de>. See also http://www.solar-system-school.de.

(2) CEDAR-GEM individual workshops, 26 June-01 July 2011, Santa Fe, NM, http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2011_Workshop:Main.

  • (a)Plasmasphere-Magnetosphere Interactions (PMI) Sessions at CEDAR/GEM,

From: Phil Erickson <pje@haystack.mit.edu>.

  • (b)High Speed Streams and Their Geospace and Atmosphere Consequences,

From: Janet Kozyra <jukozyra@umich.edu>.

  • (c)Electrodynamic Coupling of the Ionosphere and Magnetosphere at Middle and Low Latitudes,

From: Naomi Maruyama <Naomi.Maruyama@noaa.gov>.


(1) PhD Studentships in Solar System Science at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Katlenburg-Lindau and the Universities of Goettingen and Braunschweig, Germany.


From Dieter Schmitt <info@solar-system-school.de>.

Dear colleague,

I would like to draw your attention to the "International Max Planck Research School on Physical Processes in the Solar System and Beyond" at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Katlenburg-Lindau and the Universities of Goettingen and Braunschweig, Germany.

The school offers excellent research possibilities for students to obtain a PhD degree in a 3-years graduate program.

The program covers the full range of physics inherent in the field of solar system science from geophysics and planetary science to solar physics as well as the underlying fundamental physics.

Applications for the program are open to highly-qualified and well-motivated students from all countries. A prerequisite is a diploma or master of science degree in physics or a related field, including a corresponding thesis. Proficiency in English is required.

The next PhD program will start in January 2012, review of application begins on 1 August 2011. Successful applicants will receive adequate financial support.

The application documents should include a CV, the filled application form (see web page), copies of university certificates and two letters of recommendation. The application can be send either by mail or by email (preferentially one attachment in pdf format) to the address given below.

For details on the IMPRS program and the application procedure, please visit http://www.solar-system-school.de or email to info@solar-system-school.de

We would very much appreciate if you post this information and the attached poster at your institute and inform your colleagues and especially potentially interested students.

With kind regards,

Dieter Schmitt


(2) CEDAR-GEM individual workshops, 26 June-01 July 2011, Santa Fe, NM, http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2011_Workshop:Main.

  • (a)Plasmasphere-Magnetosphere Interactions (PMI) Sessions at CEDAR/GEM

From: Phil Erickson <pje@haystack.mit.edu>.

Call for Participation:

  • Session I: (Mon 27 Jun, 4 - 6 pm)
  • Session II: (Tue 28 Jun, 10 - 12 am)
  • Session III: "M-I Coupling within Plasmasphere Boundary Layer"

JOINT WITH CEDAR. (Tue 28 Jun, 1:30-3:30p)

From: Jerry Goldstein <jgoldstein AT swri.edu>, Maria Spasojevic <mariaspasojevic AT stanford.edu>, Joe Borovksy <jborovsky@lanl.gov>, Phil Erickson <pje@haystack.mit.edu>

GENERAL CALL: The GEM PMI focus group would like to invite presentation and participation in three sessions at this year's GEM/CEDAR joint workshop. The three sessions take place on Monday and Tuesday, as listed above. Session III is devoted especially to joint GEM/CEDAR topics. We also invite active participation and presentations of new results by members of the LSW FST on the Plasmasphere. Please e-mail us for a speaking slot as soon as possible.

SCIENCE TOPICS:

1) Modeling plasmaspheric density: formation, evolution, morphology. Observations in support of models, and model-data comparisons. What are the radial, MLT, and field-aligned structures? What evidence is there for interhemispheric asymmetries?

2) The inner magnetospheric electric field: global modeling, observations, and impact.

3) Plasmaspheric plume density distribution. How well do plasmaspheric drainage plumes map to ionospheric SED plumes moving westward? What is the altitude and temporal signature as we move from low to mid to high latitudes? What creates the "lumpy" structure within plumes, and how does this structure evolve? Is the plasma inside late-storm plumes from the magnetosphere, or outflow from a hot-ionosphere high-latitude source? Where are the gaps in understanding?

4) PBL electric field variability. What is the altitude dependence of the variability and what implications does this have for field-aligned currents and the scaling of the magnetic field mapping function / electric field structuring? Do we have enough empirical evidence to make a statement and can data-guided models help?

5) Plasmapause location and structure. How do ionospheric and magnetospheric people locate the plasmapause / PBL? Are these compatible? What forms the structure seen on the PBL inner edge?

6) Wave/particle interactions and macroscale instabilities in the PBL. Where are these located (in plasmasphere, in ducts, on plasmapause, within plume, ..)? Where do they have an impact on particle trajectories through scattering or anomalous heating?

7) Conductivity control of PBL electrodynamics. How is the coupled electric field on PBL field lines affected by ionospheric conductivity in either or both hemispheres?


WANT TO SPEAK? Requests for speaking slots, ideas, comments, or questions:

Jerry Goldstein <jgoldstein AT swri.edu>, Maria Spasojevic <mariaspasojevic AT stanford.edu>, Joe Borovksy <jborovsky@lanl.gov>, Phil Erickson <pje@haystack.mit.edu>


(2) CEDAR-GEM individual workshops, 26 June-01 July 2011, Santa Fe, NM, http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2011_Workshop:Main.

  • (b)High Speed Streams and Their Geospace and Atmosphere Consequences,

Invitation to Participate:Please come and participate in a multi-disciplinary discussion of the response of geospace and the atmosphere to high speed streams, both in general and as observed during the recent unusual solar minimum. All are welcome!

  • Speakers (listed below) have been invited to introduce new findings, the questions they raise, and possible consequences in other geospace regions.
  • We are very interested in information about additional features in geospace during high-speed streams. Please let the conveners know if you have 1-2 slides to present that raise new issues.
  • We are hoping to take advantage of the unique environment that the joint CEDAR-GEM meeting provides to identify the signatures of related processes in different regions.

Please come and add your expertise to the mix in the joint workshop. Workshop Description:This workshop addresses the impacts of high speed streams on the development of auroral activity, radiation belt enhancements, inner magnetosphere-subauroral response, and atmospheric perturbations. A particular sub-focus is to explore the changes in the geospace-atmosphere response in the recent unusual solar minimum interval due to the combination of strong and long-lasting high speed streams, the lowest average IMF and solar wind densities ever recorded at 1 AU, and the lowest solar EUV fluxes in three solar cycles, placing system responses into a backdrop of tenuous ionospheric densities and low conductivities.

Draft Agenda

30 June 2011, Session 1 Magnetic Activity during HSS

  • 1330 Robert McPherron -- Solar wind - magnetosphere coupling during high speed streams, in the recent solar minimum, and in the preceding solar minimum
  • 1350 Raluca Ilie - periodicities in the solar wind and magnetosphere during HSS
  • 1410 Vania Jordanova - ring current dynamics during high speed streams
  • 1430 Jeff Thayer - CIR/HSS impact on the thermosphere
  • 1450 Olga Verkhoglyadova Ð Ionospheric TEC and thermospheric emission dynamics during HSS
  • 1510 Yue Deng - Joule heating and 9-day periodicity of HSS

30 June 2011, Session 2 Radiation Belts and HSS

  • 1600 Joe Borovsky - Radiation belts during weak high speed streams in 2006-2007
  • 1620 Wen Li - Chorus waves seen on THEMIS during high speed streams High Speed Stream Effects in the Atmosphere-Ionosphere & Consequences
  • 640 Sharon Vadas - Differences in propagation and dissipation of gravity waves during SC24
  • 1700 John Emmert - Causes and consequencesÊof low thermospheric densities this minimum
  • 1720 Stan Solomon: Upper atmosphere and ionosphere at Solar Minimum
  • 1740-1800 Summary, Discussion, and 1-2 Slide Contributions from Participants

(2) CEDAR-GEM individual workshops, 26 June-01 July 2011, Santa Fe, NM, http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2011_Workshop:Main.

  • (c)Electrodynamic Coupling of the Ionosphere and Magnetosphere at Middle and Low Latitudes,

From: Naomi Maruyama <Naomi.Maruyama@noaa.gov>

Session: Mon 27 Jun, 1330-1530

Room: Convention Center O'Keefe+Milagro

Conveners: Bela Fejer <bela.fejer at usu.edu>, Thomas Immel <immel at ssl.berkeley.edu>, Stanislav Sazykin <sazykin at rice.edu>, Naomi Maruyama <naomi.maruyama at noaa.gov>

We would like to invite presentations and participation in this session at the GEM-CEDAR joint workshop. The session description and a list of science questions are given below. The format of the presentations is informal with several slides and we would like to encourage science discussions. If you are interested to give a talk in the session, please let us know.

Session Description:

In the last decade, there have been many new development in understanding the electrodynamic coupling of the inner magnetosphere with the middle and low latitude I-T system. One of the great achievements was the identification and explanation of common magnetic-storm processes in plasmaspheric and ionospheric data and images, and the realization that disturbance dynamo and prompt penetration electric fields are not independent but interact with each other non-linearly. New developments continue to highlight the coupled nature of the system during quiet times as well as in response to magnetic storms. Significant gaps in our understanding still exist and lie in the need to quantify the various sources of electrodynamic variability at mid and low latitudes and the interactions and feedback between them. For instance, during quiet times, fluctuating winds in the thermosphere from sources in the lower atmosphere are likely to compete with fluctuation of magnetospheric sources, both in terms of driving winds and in imposing modest penetration electric fields. These sources of quiet-time fluctuations in the fields, render it extremely difficult to separate storm from quiet, since the background from one day to the next can be 50% of the signal. During storms the magnetospheric sources tends to dominate but lack of knowledge in the uncertainty in the quiet background can confuse interpretation of the storm response. This workshop is designed to bring together the CEDAR and GEM experts in the sources of mid and low latitude electrodynamics from the inner magnetosphere, thermospheric wind dynamo, and forcing from the lower atmosphere.

New science questions to lead discussions:

1) Response of low and mid-latitude ionosphere to penetrating magnetospheric fields vs. disturbance dynamo. During a storm, the effects of both penetrating magnetospheric fields and disturbance dynamo fields drive changes in the ionosphere. What's typical, what's not? Does the F-layer go up or down, at what local times and for how long after storm onset? During disturbances, can the effects be reasonably separated or predicted? Do the responses depend on solar flux conditions?

2) Contribution of magnetospheric sources to quiet-time variability at low and mid latitudes. During periods of low geomagnetic activity, the ionosphere continues to exhibit large variability. Is this due only to sources such as tropospheric forcing, or is the ionosphere more susceptible to forcing from magnetospheric sources, owing to the low ionospheric/magnetospheric densities of recent solar minimum conditions?

3) Storm-time wind dynamo electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. The thermospheric winds that develop during geomagnetic storms drive electric fields that have a profound effect on the ionosphere. This disturbance dynamo develops after storm onset and persists for many hours after storm drivers lessen. These storm-time fields develop on magnetic L-shells that are usually occupied by cold plasma, but stripped of that during storms. What do the storm time dynamo electric fields look like from the point of view of the inner magnetosphere? Are these important for post-storm plasmaspheric dynamics?