Community:Email 21jun13c

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent 12 June 2013. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) Special ANGEO Issue on C/NOFS Results and Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics - due 31 August. From Jeff Klenzing <jeffrey.klenzing at nasa.gov>.

(2) Invitation to participate in the CEDAR workshops linked at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Agenda

  • (a) System-Theoretic Approach to CEDAR Science -- Wednesday June 26 (1:30 - 3:30pm).

From Tomoko Matsuo <tomoko.matsuo at colorado.edu>.

  • (b) Data assimilation at MIT boundaries, 13:30-15:30 in Flagstaff on Tuesday, June 25.

From Seebany Datta-Barua <sdattaba at iit.edu>.

  • (c) Planning Observing System Configurations for Answering Geospace

System Science by Utilizing Simulation and Data Assimilation, Wed June 26 10-12AM. From Gary Bust <Gary.Bust at jhuapl.edu>.


(1) Special ANGEO Issue on C/NOFS Results and Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics - due 31 August.


From Jeff Klenzing <jeffrey.klenzing at nasa.gov>.

The C/NOFS Results and Equatorial Dynamics Technical Interchange Meeting was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on 12–14 March 2013. The meeting was a great success with nearly 80 participants, and covered topics including the numerical simulations of plasma irregularities, the effects of tides, stratospheric phenomena, and magnetic storms on the upper atmosphere, causes and predictions of scintillation-causing ionospheric irregularities, current and future instrumentation efforts in the equatorial region. We invite the participants of this meeting, or other researchers with closely aligned research aims, to submit their new and original research topics to the special issue of Annales Geophysicae, titled "C/NOFS results and equatorial ionospheric dynamics".

The special issue will be an electronic collection where individual papers are published immediately rather than remaining "in press" until the final paper is accepted. The review process will be the same as for any submission to Annales Geophysicae. Please email jeffrey.klenzing@nasa.gov with any questions about the special issue.

Guest Editors: M. Pinnock, J. Klenzing, J. Retterer, L. C. Gentile, R. Stoneback, O. De La Beaujardiere, and F. Rodrigues


(2) Invitation to participate in the CEDAR workshops linked at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Agenda

  • (a) System-Theoretic Approach to CEDAR Science -- Wednesday June 26 (1:30 - 3:30pm).

From Tomoko Matsuo <tomoko.matsuo at colorado.edu>.

Invitation to participate in the CEDAR workshops linked at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Agenda


System-Theoretic Approach to CEDAR Science -- Wednesday June 26 (1:30 - 3:30pm)

This workshop will address the need, raised in CEDAR/NewDimension strategic thrusts #1 and #6, for the integration of "systems science" approaches in order to meet the future challenges of the CEDAR community. A tutorial followed by a few brief application presentations will prepare attendees to understand and participate in a panel discussion and forum on the potentials, challenges and effective application of system theory and systematic inference methodologies. The goal is to entice and inspire scientists in the CEDAR community to bring this new perspective to their own science questions, and to share processes of formulating questions and approaches that incorporate system theory.

The session will begin with an introduction to terms and methodologies of system theory and inference approaches (Part I). Three short talks will then cover examples of specific applications to demonstrate the potential and bottleneck issues of applying system science approaches to CEDAR science questions (Part II). Finally, an open discussion will be a forum on the potential and effective application of systems science approaches to address outstanding CEDAR science questions (Part III).

  • Part I
    • -- Overview of system theory fundamentals and relevance to geospace science -- by Farzad Kamalabadi
  • Part II
    • -- System science with stochastic differential equations -- by David Hysell
    • -- Data assimilation and ensemble modeling for system science -- by Tomoko Matsuo
    • -- Selected topics in geospace systems science(1) -- by Josh Semeter
  • Part III
    • -- Open Discussion

(1)Examples related to geospace plasma circulation and solar wind energy transfer are used to illustrate the need for distributed sensing, long-term data collection, and a systems theoretic approach.

We'd like to invite everyone to participate in this workshop and contribute to an open discussion. Please bring a few viewgraphs to present if you'd like.

For questions and suggestions, please contact us.

Tomoko Matsuo <tomoko.matsuo@colorado.edu>, David Hysell <david.hysell@cornell.edu>, Farzad Kamalabadi <farzadk@uiuc.edu>, Joshua Semeter <jls@bu.edu>

The CEDAR webpage is at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Systems_theoretical_approach


(2) Invitation to participate in the CEDAR workshops linked at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Agenda

  • (b) Data assimilation at MIT boundaries, 13:30-15:30 in Flagstaff on Tuesday, June 25.

From Seebany Datta-Barua <sdattaba at iit.edu>.

Conveners Datta-Barua, Matsuo, Bust, Pi, Scherliess

http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Data_assimilation_at_MIT_boundaries

Overview

Data assimilation has been developing in recent years as a viable method for specification and forecast of upper atmospheric dynamics. This workshop will focus on the capabilities and complexities of using data assimilation for improved understanding of dynamical coupling, particularly at the overlapping magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (MIT) regions. The science challenge to be addressed by this workshop is: what new insights on coupling at the boundaries does data assimilation give us? What does it have the potential to provide? What are the current limitations of data assimilation, and what strategies, techniques, and data could and should be brought to bear to address the limitations?

This workshop will give an overview of new science on exchange processes between boundaries of the coupled region as enabled by existing algorithms, techniques, and the data sets and models that underlie them. Papers dealing with techniques in assimilation of data into models, expansion of data sources available for assimilation, and new science findings enabled by assimilation are welcome. The session will also include a discussion to identify key elements that underlie the challenges in assimilation, ways to measure progress in assimilative methods, and suggest possible ways forward. Having identified areas for development, we will plan a follow-on workshop to be held at CEDAR 2014 in which these themes are addressed, and progress in the community is self-assessed.

For this workshop we welcome all members of the data assimilation community to make brief presentations on the current status of their algorithms and future plans. We also welcome the entire CEDAR / GEM community to be part of the planning discussion, since these data assimilation algorithms are of benefit to the entire community.

Workshop Part 1 (1 hour) The first half of the workshop will be devoted to brief “state-of-the-field” reports on the current status of MIT data assimilation algorithms, and next-stage research and development plans for these algorithms. Confirmed speakers include:


Doug Brinkman, Aerospace, Accuracy metric comparison with IDA4D

Gary Bust, JHUAPL, Indirect Estimation of IT State at High Resolution

Ellen Cousins, NCAR, Data assimilation of SuperDARN mid- and high-latitude data

Alex Cushley, Royal Military College, Ionospheric Tomography Using Faraday Rotation of Automatic Dependant Surveillance Broadcast UHF Signals

I-Te Lee, NCAR, COSMIC EDP into NCAR/TIEGCM using Ensemble Kalman Filtering

Xiaoqing Pi, JPL: TBD

Ludger Scherliess, USU: The use of a data assimilation model for the estimation of ionospheric drivers and their use for CEDAR science

Workshop Part 2 (1 hour)

The second half of the workshop (1 hour) will be a planning discussion on developing a community-wide data assimilation self-assessment and validation of various algorithms and the state of MIT data assimilation, in a cooperative, joint, and interactive manner.

Topics for the open forum Discussion Session include:

Technical challenges:

  • - How to effectively assimilate data in the presence of large model errors/biases
  • - How to estimate model drivers when direct observations of drivers are unavailable
  • - How to deal with observation sparsity

Ways to measure progress:

  • - How does data assimilation help solve CEDAR science questions?
  • - How has data assimilation improved specification and forecasting?

(2) Invitation to participate in the CEDAR workshops linked at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/2013_Workshop:Agenda

  • (c) Planning Observing System Configurations for Answering Geospace

System Science by Utilizing Simulation and Data Assimilation, Wed June 26 10-12AM.


From Gary Bust <Gary.Bust at jhuapl.edu>.

Convened by: Gary Bust, Seebany Datta-Barua, Lars Dyrud, Jonathan Fentzke, Doug Brinkman

When: Wednesday 10-12 am

Email for information / contributions: Gary Bust gary.bust@jhuapl.edu


Objectives of the Workshop:

To define an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to carry out in the next year that will allow us to assess the performance improvements of various ionosphere-thermosphere observing systems when they are ingested into ionosphere-thermosphere data assimilation algorithms. Note, that the objectives of this workshop is NOT TO COMPARE THE PERFORMANCE OF DIFFERENT MODELS OR ASSIMILATION METHODS. Rather, it is to assess the impact an existing, planned, or proposed observing system would have on improving the performance of data assimilation algorithms.

Considering all this, this is fundamentally a PLANNING WORKSHOP. Discussions on how we go about this, what our choices are, who is willing to volunteer to do specific parts, how we share results and what we want to accomplish before next year CEDAR is the focus of this workshop. Presentations, if shown at all, should touch on one of the areas of discussion described below, and should be SHORT (1-3 slides).

Goals to achieve during the workshop

a) We would like to converge on a set of ionospheric-thermospheric simulations of “truth”, and decide who is going to contribute them.

b) We need to decide what observing systems we want to study in this first year.

c) Then, once we have decided a) and b) above, we need to come to an agreement on who is going to actually simulate the observations, and what the output format of the simulated data will be.

d) Once we have the “truth” ionospheres, and simulations of data, we need to see who feels they want to, and have the time, to run the simulated observations through their data assimilation algorithms.

e) Next, we need to discuss what metrics we want to use to compare the DA results with the truth. The metrics we could consider could be scientific, space weather or applied metrics. We know metrics have been discussed and considered, so we don’t have to reinvent the wheel, just decide on what we want to use.

f) Then, we need to see who is willing to compute the metrics from the DA results. The default case is the owners of the DA algorithms could compute their own metrics.

g) Finally, we need to discuss and converge on how we will communicate and share the simulations, truth, results and analysis among the people involved. We need to decide how much we can realistically do in the first year, and what we want to have as results by CEDAR 2014.

The format of the workshop will be:

1000 – 1045:

  • Introduction to the goals and format and expected outcomes of the workshop.
  • Then short 1-3 slide presentations on concepts / ideas related to the goals of the workshops (OSSE simulations)

1045 – 1115: Break out into 4 working groups:

  • Truth modeling of IT simulations
  • Observing systems we want to simulate and test in first year
  • Data Assimilation Algorithms that will be run on the simulations
  • Metrics of performance analysis of the observing system

1115-1200:

  • Put together results of the working groups
  • Specific plans to carry out in the next year
  • How to share simulations, results and analysis among team members
  • Meetings of opportunity at AGU etc
  • Plans for next year CEDAR results

Everyone who has any interest in these kind of simulations of observing systems and assessing performance prior to deploying them, is welcome to come, participate in the working groups, and be involved in the long term studies.