Community:Email 26jul13b

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent 26 July 2013. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) CEDAR 2013 Workshop videos are now on-line and available as DVDs. From Barbara Emery (emery at ucar.edu). See also http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/Workshop:CEDAR_Videos

(2) New SPA Advocacy Committee. From Jim Klimchuk <james.a.klimchuk at nasa.gov>.

(3) Call for JGR-Space Physics Papers due 9 September for “The Causes and Consequences of the Extended Solar Minimum between Solar Cycles 23 and 24”. From <Simon.Wing at jhuapl.edu>. See also the GEMS Web site for JGR-Space Physics linked at http://www.agu.org

(4) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (a) SM006: Case Studies in Storm-Time Electrodynamics and Ionosphere-Thermosphere Response.

From Thomas Immel <immel at ssl.berkeley.edu>.

  • (b) SM015: Plasma Access to the Inner Magnetosphere.

From <jichun.zhang at unh.edu>.


(1) CEDAR 2013 Workshop videos are now on-line and available as DVDs.


From Barbara Emery (emery at ucar.edu).

The 2013 CEDAR Workshop was held in Boulder, Colorado from Saturday to Friday June 22-28. Included on video are the the third Distinguished lecture, 24th CEDAR Prize Lecture, 3 Tutorials, 3 Science Highlights, and the Workshop "50 years of Gravity Wave Research - a Tribute to Colin Hines". The videos cover 8h 7min on 3 DVDs with breakpoints and tables of contents. The price for a single DVD is $30, while the set of 3 is $80 from Brian Day of Daylight Productions and Rentals at brian@daylightav.com. The .pdf and mp4 on-line versions of these talks are linked at

http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu/wiki/index.php/Workshop:CEDAR_Videos


(2) New SPA Advocacy Committee.


From Jim Klimchuk <james.a.klimchuk at nasa.gov>.

As I am sure you are aware, our discipline is being threatened. Budgets have sharply declined, and further cuts are being considered. To reverse this dangerous trend, it is imperative that we speak up as a unified community. Strong advocacy has worked effectively for other disciplines, but we are perceived as being complacent. The squeaky wheel gets the grease! I have therefore created a new SPA Advocacy Committee. Its charge (see below) is to lead the effort to remind the various stakeholders of the importance of our science and its value to the nation. The members of the Committee are Len Fisk (Chair), Dan Baker, Gordon Emslie, Maura Hagan, and Harlan Spence. You may notice a lack of junior and mid-career scientists. I feel this is warranted for this initial committee due to the extreme urgency of the situation.

These first members are all highly experienced leaders in this arena who can act quickly and decisively. However, we need everyone's help. If there are letter-writing campaigns, please participate. Congressional staffers consistently tell us that this works. The Committee may choose to create task forces. If asked to serve, please do. Or consider volunteering even before you are contacted. We are all in this together. If we act as a cohesive Heliophysics community, we can make positive things happen! Thanks.

SPA Advocacy Committee

Charter

The American Geophysical Union Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) Advocacy Committee is established on July 24, 2013. The charge of the Committee is to promote support for the field of Space Physics and Aeronomy, especially by the funding agencies and by the government in general.

This will be done by all appropriate means, including letter writing campaigns, personal visits, newspaper editorials, and position statements. Audiences include Congress, the leadership of the funding agencies (especially NASA and NSF), the Office of Management and Budget, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy. The Committee will monitor and evaluate the political environment, develop advocacy strategies, and implement those strategies. The Committee is free to pursue its objectives as it sees fit, including the option of recruiting members of the SPA community to serve on task forces. Each task force would be led by a Committee member, with the entire Committee providing oversight. The task forces should be representative of the community and include junior and mid-career scientists. The Committee will keep the elected SPA Officers apprised of its activities. Any especially significant or highly visible statements made on behalf of the SPA must be approved by the Officers.

The Committee will consist of five members, including the Chair. The term of office is two years, commensurate with the terms of the SPA Officers. It is preferable that some members be reappointed for a second term to maintain continuity. Each of the four science sub-disciplines of the SPA will be represented: ionospheric (ITM), magnetospheric, heliospheric, and solar physics.

Note: I submit this article as President of the SPA and not as a federal employee.


(3) Call for JGR-Space Physics Papers due 9 September for “The Causes and Consequences of the Extended Solar Minimum between Solar Cycles 23 and 24”.


From <Simon.Wing at jhuapl.edu>.

  • Submission acceptance begins: 1 July 2013
  • Submission deadline: 9 September 2013

Guest Editors: Alexis P. Rouillard, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Stanley C. Solomon, National Center for Atmospheric Research, and Simon Wing, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

The period of low solar activity between solar cycles 23 and 24, that occurred from 2007 through 2009, was as long and as quiet as any on record since the beginning of space flight, and likely in over a century. The overarching challenge for solar physics is to explain why this happened, how unusual it was, and what the ramifications are for solar activity and the strength of the solar cycle on longer time scales. The unusual conditions provide a unique opportunity to assess the nature and structure of a very quiet Sun, and an upper atmosphere of the Earth relatively devoid of solar influences, which has helped to advance understanding of the role of solar activity in the dynamics and variability of the Earth’s upper atmosphere and ionosphere. This special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research solicits research papers that analyze the physical causes and consequences of this solar minimum at the Sun, the heliosphere and in the near-Earth space environment. The first section of the special issue will treat the magnetic field inside the Sun, and its influence on the corona and heliosphere. The second section will discuss the electromagnetic radiation output of the Sun, and its effect on the ionosphere- thermosphere system. The third section will describe the plasma output of the Sun from the corona and heliosphere to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system.

Manuscripts should be submitted through the GEMS Web site for JGR-Space Physics. For additional information, please contact: jgr-spacephysics@agu.org


(4) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (a) SM006: Case Studies in Storm-Time Electrodynamics and Ionosphere-Thermosphere Response.

From Thomas Immel <immel at ssl.berkeley.edu>.

There is a session at AGU that may well be of interest to of the CEDAR community. It is a joint Magnetospheric Physics and Aeronomy session, with a focus on conditions in geospace during geomagnetic storms, particularly focused on interesting or unique behaviors of individual storms that may inform the broader discussion and understanding of storms overall. Abstracts are due August 6, and we invite the CEDAR community to please consider submitting an abstract of their own interesting periods of study for a good discussion in San Francisco. The session description and other info are noted below.

SM006. Case Studies in Storm-Time Electrodynamics and Ionosphere-Thermosphere Response

Understanding magnetosphere-ionosphere storm-time dynamics has been informed by statistical analyses but the average storm may hide critical features of system. This session solicits observational and theoretical/simulation analyses of individual storm-time events. The objective is to contribute to a deeper understanding of high-latitude storm-time electrodynamics and the consequences for ionospheric/thermospheric response including feedback by comprehensive case studies. The session aims to include a mix of detailed examination of individual events as well as studies comparing and contrasting behavior in multiple storms. The session is open to submission of multiple papers studying the same event or events.

Conveners:

  • Brian Anderson, Johns Hopkins Univ, brian.anderson@jhuapl.edu
  • Thomas Immel, University of California, Berkeley, immel@ssl.berkeley.edu
  • Geoffrey Crowley, ASTRA, gcrowley@astraspace.net
  • Cheryl Huang, Air Force Research Laboratory, cheryl.huang@us.af.mil

http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/scientific-program/session-search/sessions/sm006-case-studies-in-storm-time-electrodynamics-and-ionosphere-thermosphere-response/


(4) 09-13 December 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA - abstracts due 6 Aug on-line at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/

  • (b) SM015: Plasma Access to the Inner Magnetosphere.

From <jichun.zhang at unh.edu>.

We would like to invite you to submit an abstract to the SM015 session at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting: Plasma Access to the Inner Magnetosphere (SM06).

Understanding crucial aspects of the physics of the inner magnetosphere requires understanding the details of how plasma is transported earthward from the plasma sheet. Recent observations of the inner and middle magnetosphere from several space missions (e.g., the Van Allen Probes, Cluster, THEMIS, TWINS, Geotail, and GOES) and progress in modeling and theory are changing our fundamental understanding of how this process works. We invite presentations based on observations, numerical simulations, theoretical investigations, or their combination that address the transport, energization, and loss of plasma-sheet plasma into the inner magnetosphere and how this transport affects ring current and radiation belt formation.

Conveners:

  • Jichun Zhang, University of New Hampshire, jichun.zhang@unh.edu
  • Frank Toffoletto, Rice University, toffo@rice.edu
  • Michael Liemohn, University of Michigan, liemohn@umich.edu
  • Pontus Brandt, Johns Hopkins U./Applied Physics Lab., pontus.brandt@jhuapl.edu

Abstracts due 6 Aug online at http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/