Community:Email 28jan10

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This is a generic mailing to the CEDAR community sent Jan 28, 2010. Meetings and jobs are listed at http://cedarweb.hao.ucar.edu under 'Community' as 'Calendar of Meetings' and 'CEDAR related opportunities'. CEDAR email messages are under 'Community' as 'CEDAR email Newsletters'. All are in 'Quick Links' on the main page.


(1) Visiting Young Scientist appointment at Dartmouth College - due 15 Mar. From james.labelle@dartmouth.edu.

(2) PhD scholarship "Relativistic electrons in electric discharges" at DTU Space in Denmark - due 31 Jan. From SPA Newsletter, 21 Jan 2010. From: Torsten Neubert (neubert at space.dtu.dk). See also http://www.space-phd.dk/English.aspx.

(3) "Long-Term Changes and Trends in the Atmosphere", June 15-18, 2010, Boulder, CO. From Liying Qian (lqian@ucar.edu). See also http://www.hao.ucar.edu/TREND2010/index.php.

(4) The 12th Quadrennial Solar-Terrestrial Physics Symposium of SCOSTEP, July 12-16, 2010, Berlin, Germany. Submitted by Gang Lu (ganglu at ucar.edu). From: Franz-Josef Luebken <luebken at iap-kborn.de>, Chairman of the local organizing committee. See also http://www.scostep.ucar.edu and http://www.iap-kborn.de/SCOSTEP2010.

(5) 38TH COSPAR SCIENTIFIC ASSEMBLY, Bremen, Germany, July 18-25, 2010. Abstracts due 19 Feb. From David Rees (drees@hovemere.com). See also http://www.cospar-assembly.org/.

(6) ARECIBO CALL FOR PROPOSALS - due 1 Feb 2010. From Sixto Gonzalez (sixto@naic.edu). See http://www.naic.edu/, http://www.naic.edu/~astro/proposals/, etc.


(1) Visiting Young Scientist appointment at Dartmouth College - due 15 Mar.


From james.labelle@dartmouth.edu.

Visiting Young Scientist: A visiting appointment for a recent Ph.D. scientist is available at Dartmouth College. The appointment would be for up to 6 months during academic year 2010-2011. The position includes teaching in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Engineering, or Earth Sciences. Extension of appointment may be possible using appropriate sponsored research projects. To qualify, candidates must be U.S. citizens engaged in research related to space science, planetary science, astrophysics, remote sensing, aerospace technology, or technology dependent on space-based platforms. To apply, send a 1-2 page summary of teaching and research goals, curriculum vitae, and the names of three references to: Visiting Young Scientist, c/o James LaBelle, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Hall, Hanover, NH 03755. For more information, e-mail james.labelle@dartmouth.edu. Applications will be reviewed starting March 15, 2009. Position funded by NASA NH Space Grant. Dartmouth College is committed to diversity in hiring, and members of under-represented groups are encouraged to apply.


(2) PhD scholarship "Relativistic electrons in electric discharges" at DTU Space in Denmark - due 31 Jan.


From: Torsten Neubert (neubert at space.dtu.dk).

A three-year PhD scholarship is available at DTU Space, with start date March 1st 2010 or as soon as possible thereafter.

The project will study how electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies in electric discharges in the atmosphere. The question has been raised after the surprising observations from satellite of high-energy radiation from the atmosphere above powerful thunderstorms, later followed by the discovery of radiation from lightning and from laboratory discharges. It is now understood that the radiation is bremsstrahlung from electrons that are accelerated to unexpected high energies. The acceleration process is not understood but is interesting because it influences the dynamics of the discharges and their effect on the atmosphere.

The microphysics of discharges is relatively unexplored because of its complexities. DTU Space has developed numerical methods to study the phenomenon with very high precision of the electron dynamics. These will be used to study the conditions for electrons to reach high energies and their influence on the discharge dynamics. The simulations will be evaluated relative to measurements from laboratory experiments.

The position, which is funded by The Danish Council for Independent Research | Natural Sciences, is related to a mission planned for the International Space Station: "The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor" (ASIM) for observations of extreme thunderstorms and their influence on the atmosphere. ASIM is led by DTU Space in collaboration with the Danish company Terma.

Qualifications Candidates should have a master's degree in engineering or a similar degree with an academic level equivalent to the master's degree in engineering.

A PhD student is sought with good background in physics and numerical methods. The study will be conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Technical University of Eindhoven, Holland, and the Russian Federal Nuclear Center - VNIIEF, Sarov, Russia.

Approval and Enrollment The study will be under the DTU Space PhD network "Space Science and Technology" http://www.space-phd.dk/English.aspx. The scholarships for the PhD degree are subject to academic approval, and the candidates will be enrolled in one of the general degree programmes of DTU. For information about the general requirements for enrollment and the general planning of the scholarship studies, please see the DTU PhD Guide

Salary and appointment terms The salary and appointment terms are consistent with the current rules for PhD degree students. The period of employment is 3 years.

The study will be based on the DTU Space "south" office, Juliane Maries Vej 30, close to downtown Copenhagen. The student will organizationally be under the Department of Solar System Physics.

Further information Further information may be obtained from Department Chair Torsten Neubert, tel. +45 3532 57231

Application We must have your online application by 31 January 2010. Please open the link "apply for this job online" and fill in the application form and attach your application and CV. The material that should be given consideration in the assessment must be attached.

All interested candidates irrespective of age, gender, race, religion or ethnic background are encouraged to apply.


(3) "Long-Term Changes and Trends in the Atmosphere", June 15-18, 2010, Boulder, CO.


From Liying Qian (lqian@ucar.edu).

The 6th IAGA/ICMA/CAWSES workshop on "Long-Term Changes and Trends in the Atmosphere" (http://www.hao.ucar.edu/TREND2010/index.php) will be held at National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Center Green Conference Center, Boulder, Colorado, USA, June 15-18, 2010, the week before the 2010 CEDAR (Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions) workshop, which will also be held in Boulder.

We are glad that this workshop coincides with the 40th year of uninterrupted work of Ray Roble, who has made substantial contributions in the topic which became a major theme of the workshop. It has been 20 years since Roble and Dickson [1989] first concluded that global change will occur in the upper atmosphere as well as in the lower atmosphere as a result of increased greenhouse gas concentrations. Since this workshop will be held at NCAR where Ray has worked for nearly 40 years, a special session will be dedicated to Ray Roble to honor his contribution to this field, featuring a lead presentation given by Ray Roble followed by a few review talks summarizing the advances in this field after the pioneering path shown in 1989.

Long-term changes to Earth's atmosphere are becoming more and more relevant to the future of our world and it is paramount that we quantify and understand changes occurring at all levels within the coupled atmospheric system. The increasing concentration of greenhouse gases, stratospheric ozone depletion, varying solar and geomagnetic activity, secular change of Earth's magnetic field, and changing dynamics propagating up from the troposphere are some of the possible causes of long-term changes in the stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere. The goals of this workshop are to review the current state of knowledge about trends in these atmospheric regions, and to discuss what research is necessary for resolving inconsistencies, reducing uncertainties, and achieving a deeper understanding of middle and upper atmospheric climate change, especially the relative influences of anthropogenic and solar effects.

We welcome papers using all types of observational techniques to determine the long-term changes and trends that have occurred in the past and also to determine the processes behind those changes. We also welcome contributions which consider the availability, quality and acquisition of various data sets which may be exploited for trend studies, and statistical methods for deriving and validating those trends. Interpretation and attribution of observational results depends heavily on theoretical models and numerical simulations of the trends, and presentations dealing with these topics are particularly welcome. While the troposphere is not the main focus of the workshop, it is clear that it has a major role to play in middle and upper atmosphere trends; papers that demonstrate this relevance are also welcome.

http://www.hao.ucar.edu/TREND2010/index.php Contacts: Liying Qian (lqian@ucar.edu)


(4) The 12th Quadrennial Solar-Terrestrial Physics Symposium of SCOSTEP, July 12-16, 2010, Berlin, Germany.


From: Franz-Josef Luebken <luebken at iap-kborn.de>, Chairman of the local organizing committee.

The Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP) (http://www.scostep.ucar.edu) will held its next quadrennial international symposium on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (STP-12) on 12-16 July 2010 in Berlin, Germany. The main theme of the symposium is on the Climate and Weather in the Sun-Earth System (CAWSES) program, which has the overall goals of fostering a scientific approach to understanding the short and long term variability of the integrated solar-terrestrial environment. More detailed information on the symposium can be found online at http://www.iap-kborn.de/SCOSTEP2010.

We would be happy to welcome you to Berlin, a great world city.


(5) 38TH COSPAR SCIENTIFIC ASSEMBLY, Bremen, Germany, July 18-25, 2010. Abstracts due 19 Feb.


From David Rees (drees@hovemere.com).

The 38TH COSPAR SCIENTIFIC ASSEMBLY will be held in Bremen, Germany, July 18-25th. 2010 Your attention is drawn to two specialist meetings that will be held during the Scientific Assembly, related to Commission C Interests:

(1) Commission C: C0.2: Advances in Remote Sensing of the Middle and Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere from the Ground and from Space, including Sounding Rockets and Multi-Instrument Studies This Meeting will provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of novel instruments for exploring the Middle and Upper Atmospheres and Ionospheres of the Earth and Planets by remote sensing techniques deployed from space platforms. The meeting will include special sessions. A special session will be devoted to the application and results from multi-instrument coordinated measurements (including ground-based / space coordinated measurements. The meeting will consist of a set of solicited papers, supported by contributed papers and Poster Presentations.

Main Scientific Organiser: Prof. David Rees. Deputy Scientific Organiser: Dr. Mamora Yamamoto. Deadline for Abstracts: February 19th 2010.

(2) Commission C: C4.2: Development of Models related to the CIRA08 - COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere This Meeting will consider the further development of Atmospheric Models related to the CIRA08 ? COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere. It will also consider contributions regarding Minor and Trace Constituent Models of the middle atmosphere. The meeting will consist of a set of solicited papers, supported by contributed papers and Poster Presentations.

Main Scientific Organiser: Prof. David Rees. Deputy Scientific Organiser: Dr. B.R. Bowman. Deadline for Abstracts: February 19th 2010.

Further information regarding these Meetings, the procedures for submission of Abstracts, and registration for the Meeting can be found on the COSPAR (http://www.cospar-assembly.org/) and ZARM Web Sites.


(6) ARECIBO CALL FOR PROPOSALS - due 1 Feb 2010.


From Sixto Gonzalez (sixto@naic.edu).

Arecibo proposals submitted for the Monday, 1st February 2010 deadline are for using the telescope in the eight months beginning 1st June 2010 (i.e. valid for two trimesters).

(1) A high percentage of Arecibo telescope time is being used for large surveys. However, we STRONGLY encourage the submission of innovative proposals that are not classified as surveys.

(2) A 700-800 MHz receiver is available for use in the band (temporarily) freed up by the recent TV channel reallocation. This receiver is continuously being improved. Proposals are encouraged on a shared risk-basis, subject to the evolution of band occupancy, and the practicality of use. The RFI situation as of 12 August, 2009, (when the last major TV turned off) can be seen via: http://www.naic.edu/~phil/800/800rfi.html#12aug09

(3) The 2 x 7 dual-polarization channel, 300-MHz bandwidth, "Mock" spectrometers are available to all ALFA users. For details see http://www.naic.edu/~astro/mock.shtml

(4) A partial implementation of a NEW SINGE-PIXEL MODE for the Mock spectrometers is available, which enables their combination such as to provide up to 1 GHz of contiguous spectral coverage. On-line pulsar folding is not yet supported.

(5) The WAPP spectrometer provides an 8-band, dual-polarization, single-pixel observing capability for spectral lines or pulsars. This mode can be used to place 8 simultaneous bands, each of up to 100-MHz bandwidth, as desired within a 1-GHz band. 680 MHz of contiguous spectrum can be covered allowing for filter roll-off. An overview of the present capabilities of the WAPP backend is to be found at: http://www2.naic.edu/~wapp/

(6) Large proposals, (i.e. those requesting at least 300-400 hr -- though at the NAIC Director's discretion, sometimes less than this), are subject to skeptical review after evaluation by the normal science referees. Progress reports of existing large proposals will be skeptically reviewed annually. All skeptical reviews will take place in August.

(7) A policy for follow-up proposals by survey consortia has been included as Section 5.8 of the web document detailing information about Proposals & Policies, see :-- http://www.naic.edu/~astro/proposals/proposal.shtml#5

Please note that the 610-MHz receiver is no longer available. Also, while we try to keep the maximum possible number of receivers cooled and ready for observing, this may not always be possible. Thus availability of the S-high and C-high receivers cannot always be guaranteed, and these receivers will often be scheduled in campaign mode.



Arecibo Observing Information --------------------------

Proposal submission details, and a web-based cover sheet, can be found at http://www.naic.edu/~astro/proposals/. A guide for new users of the telescope is at http://www.naic.edu/~astro/guide. Other user-related information is at http://www.naic.edu/~astro/astronomy.htm.

Radio sources with declinations of about -1 < Dec < +37.5 deg are visible from Arecibo, and can be tracked over the range of zenith angles between 1.1 and 19.7 deg.

Available receivers in the (frequency-agile) Gregorian Dome, their frequency coverage, typical System Temperature, Telescope Gain and System Equivalent Flux Density (SEFD = Tsys(K)/Telescope_Gain(K/Jy)) are:


Rx-name Freq[.] coverage Tsys (K) Gain (K/Jy) SEFD (Jy)


327 312 -- 342 MHz 50 + Tsky 10.5 >7.5 430Gr 422 -- 442 MHz 45 + Tsky 11 5 800 700 -- 800 MHz ~110 9 11 ALFA 1225 - 1525 MHz 30 ~10 ~3 L-wide 1.15 - 1.73 GHz 25 - 40 9 - 11 2.4 S-low 1.8 - 3.1 GHz 32 8 3.4 S-radar 2.33 - 2.43 GHz 25 10 2.5 S-high 3.0 - 4.0 GHz 28 - 34 7 - 10 3.3 C 3.85 - 6.1 GHz 25 - 30 6 - 10 3 (5 GHz) C-high 5.9 - 8.1 GHz 26 - 29 4.5 - 7.5 5 (6.9 GHz) X 7.8 - 10.2 GHz 28 - 35 2.5 - 5.5 7.5 (9 GHz)


To these should be added the 47 and 430-MHz systems in the Carriage House. For the latter;


Rx-name Freq. coverage Tsys (K) Gain (K/Jy) SEFD (Jy)


CH430 425 -- 435 MHz 60 - 100 8 - 16 3.5 - 12


Pulsar, spectral-line, VLBI, and continuum backends are available to exploit all these receivers.

The Arecibo Mk-5A disc-based recorder for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is available for use with the HSA, EVN and Global networks at all bands up to 10 GHz. Those wishing to include the ultra-high sensitivity of Arecibo in their VLBI observations should submit proposals directly to these networks rather than to Arecibo, including justification for the use of the 305-m telescope. The maximum data recording rate at Arecibo is currently 1 Gbps. However, HSA observations are limited to a maximum data rate of 512 Mbps. eVLBI science runs with the EVN have been made up to 512 Mbps.

The Mk-5A system is also available for single-dish baseband-sampled data recording.